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  • The Security Archipelago: Human-Security States, Sexuality Politics, and the End of Neoliberalism

    Author(s): Paul Amar
    Published: 2013
    Pages: 328
    Illustrations: 41 photographs, 5 figures
    Series: a Social Text book
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  • Acknowledgments  vii
    Introduction. The Archipelago of New Security-State Uprisings  1
    1. Mooring a New Global Order between Cairo and Rio de Janeiro: World Summits and Human-Security Laboratories  39
    2. Policing the Perversions of Globalization in Rio de Janeiro and Cairo: Emerging Parastatal Security Regimes Confront Queer Globalisms  65
    3. Muhammad Atta's Urbanism: Rescuing Islam, Saving Humanity, and Securing Gender's Proper Place in Cairo  99
    4. Saving the Cradle of Samba in Rio de Janeiro: Shadow-State Uprisings, Urban Infranationalisms, and the Racial Politics of Human Security  139
    5. Operation Princess in Rio de Janeiro: Rescuing Sex Slaves, Challenging the Labor-Evangelical Alliance, and Defining the Sexuality Politics of an Emerging Human-Security Superpower  172
    6. Feminist Insurrections and the Egyptian Revolution: Harassing Police, Recognizing Classphobias, and Everting the Logics of the Human-Security State in Tahrir Square  200
    Conclusion. The End of Neoliberalism?  235
    Notes  253
    References  261
    Index  297
  • "An extraordinary book that revolutionizes the way to think about security, undermines conventional wisdom, and offers us a wonderfully lucid study of an obscure subject-matter, including detailed inquiry into state/society relations in Egypt and Brazil. Among many contributions is the brilliant depiction of the evolving interface between state security (its visible and invisible apparatus) and people subject to its control, including a fascinating account of the sexualization of politics as an emergent dimension of both oppression and resistance. A must read!"—Richard Falk, coauthor of The Path to Zero: Dialogues on Nuclear Dangers

    "Paul Amar is a totally unique scholar. He works in English, Arabic, and Portuguese and he studies security regimes in a comparative framework that encompasses the Middle East, North and South America, and Europe. For this reason, it is not surprising that The Security Archipelago is a one of a kind book. Combining the research that he has done in Brazil and Egypt on the emergence of new forms of security and new grammars of protest politics with the unfolding stories of an economic boom in Brazil and political change in Egypt, Amar has written an up to the moment account of the 'human-security state' and its opponents. Anyone who seeks to understand emergent orders of security alongside the political movements challenging them around the world must read this book."—Jack Halberstam, author of The Queer Art of Failure

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  • Description

    In The Security Archipelago, Paul Amar provides an alternative historical and theoretical framing of the refashioning of free-market states and the rise of humanitarian security regimes in the Global South by examining the pivotal, trendsetting cases of Brazil and Egypt. Addressing gaps in the study of neoliberalism and biopolitics, Amar describes how coercive security operations and cultural rescue campaigns confronting waves of resistance have appropriated progressive, antimarket discourses around morality, sexuality, and labor. The products of these struggles—including powerful new police practices, religious politics, sexuality identifications, and gender normativities—have traveled across an archipelago, a metaphorical island chain of what the global security industry calls "hot spots." Homing in on Cairo and Rio de Janeiro, Amar reveals the innovative resistances and unexpected alliances that have coalesced in new polities emerging from the Arab Spring and South America's Pink Tide. These have generated a shared modern governance model that he terms the "human-security state."

    About The Author(s)

    Paul Amar is Associate Professor of Global Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. A political scientist and anthropologist, he has worked as a journalist in Egypt, a police reformer in Brazil, and a United Nations conflict resolution and economic development specialist.