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  • Indigenous Struggle at the Heart of Brazil: State Policy, Frontier Expansion, and the Xavante Indians, 1937–1988

    Author(s): Seth Garfield
    Published: 2001
    Pages: 328
    Illustrations: 11 b&w photographs, 3 tables, 8 maps
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
  • Cloth: $94.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-2661-8
  • Paperback: $26.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-2665-6
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  • List of Maps

    List of Tables

    List of Illustrations

    Acknowledgments

    1. Introduction: Indians and the Nation-State in Brazil

    2. “The Base of Our National Character”: Indians and the Estado Novo, 1937–1945

    3. “Pacifying” the Xavante: 1941–1966


    4. “The Father of the Family Provoking Opposition”: State Efforts to Remake the Xavante, 1946–1961

    5. “Noble Gestures of Independence and Pride”: Land Policies in Mato Grosso, 1946–1964

    6. “Brazilindians”: Accommodation with Waradzu, 1950–1964

    7. “Where the Earth Touches the Sky”: New Horizons for Indigenous Policy under Early Military Rule, 1964–1972

    8. The Exiles Return, 1972–1980

    9. The Xavante Project, 1978–1988

    10. Conclusion

    Notes

    Bibliography

    Index
  • “A pioneering analysis of Brazilian government policy toward the indigenous population from the standpoint of contemporary history. Garfield goes beyond the sensationalism which characterizes so much criticism of government policy to provide a thoughtful, well-balanced, and highly revealing study.”—Thomas E. Skidmore, author of Brazil: Five Centuries of Change — N/A

    “This fine historical study illuminates a host of crucial questions about Brazilian state formation, racial discourses, and national identity. Its pathbreaking reconstruction of the complicated interaction between the Xavante communities and the Brazilian state provides us with vivid examples of the way in which the policies of a modernizing state serve to reduce the complexities of indigenous culture but at the same time create possibilities for entirely new strategies of resistance and negotiation.”—Barbara Weinstein, author of For Social Peace in Brazil: Industrialists and the Remaking of the Working Class in São Paolo, 1920–1964 — N/A

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  • Description

    Indigenous Struggle at the Heart of Brazil examines the dynamic interplay between the Brazilian government and the Xavante Indians of central Brazil in the context of twentieth-century western frontier expansion and the state’s indigenous policy. Offering a window onto Brazilian developmental policy in Amazonia and the subsequent process of indigenous political mobilization, Seth Garfield bridges historical and anthropological approaches to reconsider state formation and ethnic identity in twentieth-century Brazil.
    Garfield explains how state officials, eager to promote capital accumulation, social harmony, and national security on the western front, sought to delimit indigenous reserves and assimilate native peoples. Yet he also shows that state efforts to celebrate Indians as primordial Brazilians and nationalist icons simultaneously served to underscore and redefine ethnic difference. Garfield explores how various other social actors—elites, missionaries, military officials, intellectuals, international critics, and the Indians themselves—strove to remold this multifaceted project. Paying particular attention to the Xavante’s methods of engaging state power after experience with exile, territorial loss, and violence in the “white” world, Garfield describes how they emerged under military rule not as the patriotic Brazilians heralded by state propagandists but as a highly politicized ethnic group clamoring for its constitutional land rights and social entitlements.
    Indigenous Struggle at the Heart of Brazil will interest not only historians and anthropologists but also those studying nationbuilding, Brazil, Latin America, comparative frontiers, race, and ethnicity.

    About The Author(s)

    Seth Garfield is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin.

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