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  • 1. Guest Editors’ Introduction–Esther C. M. Yau and Kyung Hyun Kim

    2. Spectral Times: The Ghost Film as Historical Allegory–Bliss Cua Lim

    3. Third Cinema in a Global Frame: Curacha, Yahoo!, and Manila by Night–Jonathan Beller

    4. Male Crisis in New Korean Cinema: Reading the Early Films of Park Kwang-su–Kyung Hyun Kim

    5. Cinema Frames, Videoscapes, and Cyberspace: Exploring Shu Lea Cheang’s Fresh Kill–Gina Marchetti

    6. Queerscapes in Contemporary Hong Kong Cinema–Helen Hok-sze Leung

    7. Claiming Sites of Independence: Articulating Hysteria in Pak Ch’ul-su’s 301/302 (1995)–Joan Kee

    8. Confronting Master Narratives: History as Vision in Miyazaki Hayao’s Cinema of De-assurance–Susan Napier

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  • Description

    This special issue of positions is a collection of thought-provoking essays that challenges the ways in which the West has traditionally experienced Asia/Pacific film. Focusing on film texts from Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan, and the Philippines, the articles explore the powerful emotions of frustration and alienation that cinema can express in the face of modernization and globalization.

    Contributors examine how specific films—including Haplos (1982), Chilsu and Mansu (1988), Fresh Kill (1994), and Princess Mononoke (1997)—rework folktales, literary sources, popular memory, lived experience, and history. Some of the films examined here incorporate supernatural elements and/or gay and lesbian narratives that provide an escape from the sexism, racism, homophobia, environmental destruction, and urban alienation that the filmmakers see as the defining characteristics of the postcolonial world.

    Asia/Pacific Cinema posits that film, with its ability to play with memory, fate, and linear time, creates a space in which to consider alternatives to the dominant cultural, economic, and social norms.

    Contributors. Jonathan Beller, Joan Kee, Kyung Hyun Kim, Helen Hok-sze Leung, Bliss Cau Lim, Gina Marchetti, Susan Napier, Esther C. M. Yau

Fall 2017
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