• Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women’s Speculative Fiction

    Author(s):
    Pages: 208
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
  • Cloth: $89.95 - Not In Stock
    978-0-8223-7073-4
  • Paperback: $23.95 - Not In Stock
    978-0-8223-7088-8
  • Prologue and Acknowledgments
    Introduction
    1. Metaphore and Materiality: Disability and Neo-Slave Narratives
    2. Whose Reality Is It Anyway? Deconstructing Able-Mindedness
    3. The Future of Bodyminds, Bodyminds of the Future
    4. Defamiliarizing (Dis)ability, Race, Gender, and Sexuality
    Conclusion
    Notes
    References
    Index
  • “In this smart and necessary book, Sami Schalk persuasively argues that black women's speculative fiction offers a rich archive of alternate framings of (dis)ability, race, sexuality, and gender that move us closer toward justice. Bodyminds Reimagined reveals how nonrealist representations can defamiliarize categories assumed to be self-evident, opening up new ways of thinking about methodology, trauma, metaphor, and politics. Schalk's work pushes all of us in feminist studies, black studies, and disability studies to reimagine how we understand minds and bodies moving though the world.” — Alison Kafer, author of, Feminist, Queer, Crip

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  • Description

    In Bodyminds Reimagined Sami Schalk traces how black women's speculative fiction complicates the understanding of bodyminds—the intertwinement of the mental and the physical—in the context of race, gender, and (dis)ability. Bridging black feminist theory with disability studies, Schalk demonstrates that this genre's political potential lies in the authors' creation of bodyminds that transcend reality's limitations. She reads (dis)ability in neo-slave narratives by Octavia Butler (Kindred) and Phyllis Alesia Perry (Stigmata) not only as representing the literal injuries suffered under slavery, but also as a metaphor for the legacy of racial violence. The fantasy worlds in works by N. K. Jemisin, Shawntelle Madison, and Nalo Hopkinson—where werewolves have obsessive-compulsive-disorder and blind demons can see magic—destabilize social categories and definitions of the human, calling into question the very nature of identity. In these texts, as well as in Butler’s Parable series, able-mindedness and able-bodiedness are socially constructed and upheld through racial and gendered norms. Outlining (dis)ability's centrality to speculative fiction, Schalk shows how these works open new social possibilities while changing conceptualizations of identity and oppression through nonrealist contexts.

    About The Author(s)

    Sami Schalk is Assistant Professor of Gender and Women's Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
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