• Sign up for new title announcements and special offers.

  • Cloth: $94.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-1534-6
  • Paperback: $24.95 - Not In Stock
    978-0-8223-1543-8
  • Quantity
  • Add To Bag
  • Acknowledgments vii

    Introduction 1

    1. Project Career Trajectory 15

    2. Cosmological Family Romance 23

    3. Short Essays 37

    4. System Crisis 43

    5. Observation as Indirect Literary Strategy 58

    6. Wit as a Formal Principle 79

    7. Double Satire and Double Irony 89

    8. Toward the Form of Critique 115

    9. Publicizing Enlightenment: Kant's Concept of Enlightenment 144

    Bibliographic Essay 167

    Notes 187

    Bibliography 225

    Index 237

  • “Goetschel’s stimulating reading of Kant is a must.”

    “This assiduously researched and convincingly argued monograph is a welcome contribution to the growing body of literature on Kant concerned with questions of rhetorical and literary form. The book is particularly valuable for its concentration on Kant’s earlier writings, both in their own right and as precursors for the Critique of Pure Reason. . . . A compelling and revealing portrait of Kant’s career and development as a writer.”

    Reviews

  • “Goetschel’s stimulating reading of Kant is a must.”

    “This assiduously researched and convincingly argued monograph is a welcome contribution to the growing body of literature on Kant concerned with questions of rhetorical and literary form. The book is particularly valuable for its concentration on Kant’s earlier writings, both in their own right and as precursors for the Critique of Pure Reason. . . . A compelling and revealing portrait of Kant’s career and development as a writer.”

  • "Providing a sense of the complex intellectual and historical context in which Kant functioned, Constituting Critique calls attention to the concern with language that pervades not just the three Critiques, but the earlier writings as well." — Samuel Weber, University of California, Los Angeles

    "This is a study that anyone seriously interested in Kant will have to take into account. Goetschel’s writing is intellectually compelling. His interpretation enriches our understanding of Kant, bridging the gap between the literary and systematic aspects of Kant’s writing." — Claudia Brodsky Lacour, Princeton University

  • Permission to Photocopy (coursepacks)

    If you are requesting permission to photocopy material for classroom use, please contact the Copyright Clearance Center at copyright.com;

    If the Copyright Clearance Center cannot grant permission, you may request permission from our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Permission to Reprint

    If you are requesting permission to reprint DUP material (journal or book selection) in another book or in any other format, contact our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Images/Art

    Many images/art used in material copyrighted by Duke University Press are controlled, not by the Press, but by the owner of the image. Please check the credit line adjacent to the illustration, as well as the front and back matter of the book for a list of credits. You must obtain permission directly from the owner of the image. Occasionally, Duke University Press controls the rights to maps or other drawings. Please direct permission requests for these images to permissions@dukeupress.edu.
    For book covers to accompany reviews, please contact the publicity department.

    Subsidiary Rights/Foreign Translations

    If you're interested in a Duke University Press book for subsidiary rights/translations, please contact permissions@dukeupress.edu. Include the book title/author, rights sought, and estimated print run.

    Disability Requests

    Instructions for requesting an electronic text on behalf of a student with disabilities are available here.

    Rights & Permissions Contact Information

    Email: permissions@dukeupress.edu
    Email contact for coursepacks: asstpermissions@dukeupress.edu
    Fax: 919-688-4574
    Mail:
    Duke University Press
    Rights and Permissions
    905 W. Main Street
    Suite 18B
    Durham, NC 27701

    For all requests please include:
    1. Author's name. If book has an editor that is different from the article author, include editor's name also.
    2. Title of the journal article or book chapter and title of journal or title of book
    3. Page numbers (if excerpting, provide specifics)
    For coursepacks, please also note: The number of copies requested, the school and professor requesting
    For reprints and subsidiary rights, please also note: Your volume title, publication date, publisher, print run, page count, rights sought
  • Description

    Kant’s philosophy is often treated as a closed system, without reference to how it was written or how Kant arrived at its familiar form, the critique. In fact, the style of the critique seems so artless that readers think of it as an unfortunate by-product—a style of stylelessness. In Constituting Critique, Willi Goetschel shows how this apparent gracelessness was deliberately achieved by Kant through a series of writing experiments. By providing an account of the process that culminated in his three Critiques, this book offers a new perspective on Kant’s philosophical thought and practice.
    Constituting Critique traces the stages in Kant’s development to reveal how he redefined philosophy as a critical task. Following the philosopher through the experiments of his early essays, Goetschel demonstrates how Kant tests, challenges, and transforms the philosophical essay in his pursuit of a new self-reflective literary genre. From these experiments, critique emerges as the philosophical form for the critical project of the Enlightenment. The imperatives of its transcendental style, Goetschel contends, not only constitute and inform the critical moment of Kant’s philosophical praxis, but also have an enduring place in post-Kantian philosophy and literature.
    By situating the Critiques within the context of Kant’s early essays, this work will redirect the attention of Kant scholars to the origins of their form. It will also encourage contemporary critical theorists to reconsider their own practice through an engagement with its source in Kant.

    About The Author(s)

    Willi Goetschel is Assistant Professor of German at Columbia University.

Explore More
Share

Create a reading list or add to an existing list. Sign-in or register now to continue.


Contact Us

  • Duke University Press
  • 905 W. Main St. Ste 18-B
  • Durham, NC 27701
  • U.S. phone (toll-free): 888-651-0122
  • International: 1-919-688-5134
  • orders@dukeupress.edu