• Diaspora and Trust: Cuba, Mexico, and the Rise of China

    Author(s):
    Pages: 280
    Illustrations: 29 illustrations
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
  • Cloth: $94.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-6057-5
  • Paperback: $24.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-6073-5
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  • Illustrations  vii

    Acknowledgments  ix

    Introduction  1

    1. Cuba, China, and the Long March to the Market  29

    2. Mexico, China, and the Politics of Trust  65

    3. Havana's Chinatown and the Quest for Synergy  99

    4. Trust and Treachery in Mexico's Chinese Diaspora  163

    Conclusion. China and the Future of History  209

    Notes  223

    References  227

    Index  255
  • "The book is a very instructive study on evolving Sino-Cuban and Sino-Mexican worlds that also offers a lesson to the United States in the time of the Trans-Paci?c Trade Agreement."

    "Hearn’s study points up the value of incorporating trust and social capital as analytical categories to help make sense of micro- and macro-level interactions. The question is whether policy makers will heed the advice Hearn’s study suggests."

    "As a cultural anthropologist who has studied social capital for the duration of his career, Hearn is well positioned to observe the fine-grained details of informal connection and exchange in all three countries as they confront the stresses and possibilities introduced by China’s growing influence."

    "Hearn renders a book that is well researched, refined, important, and timely. Most impressive of all, Diaspora and Trust is accessible without lacking complexity or sophistication. It will appeal to academics and nonacademics equally."

    "An important book. . . . Diaspora and Trust deserves thoughtful consideration from scholars of Asia's transpacific communities as well as those who study immigration, anthropology, and history."

    Reviews

  • "The book is a very instructive study on evolving Sino-Cuban and Sino-Mexican worlds that also offers a lesson to the United States in the time of the Trans-Paci?c Trade Agreement."

    "Hearn’s study points up the value of incorporating trust and social capital as analytical categories to help make sense of micro- and macro-level interactions. The question is whether policy makers will heed the advice Hearn’s study suggests."

    "As a cultural anthropologist who has studied social capital for the duration of his career, Hearn is well positioned to observe the fine-grained details of informal connection and exchange in all three countries as they confront the stresses and possibilities introduced by China’s growing influence."

    "Hearn renders a book that is well researched, refined, important, and timely. Most impressive of all, Diaspora and Trust is accessible without lacking complexity or sophistication. It will appeal to academics and nonacademics equally."

    "An important book. . . . Diaspora and Trust deserves thoughtful consideration from scholars of Asia's transpacific communities as well as those who study immigration, anthropology, and history."

  • "Based on fifteen years of field research in Cuba, Mexico, and China, Diaspora and Trust gives us an insightful bottom-up account of the complex relationship between receiving societies, and the resident Chinese immigrant communities. An original and important contribution to the field of immigrant transnationalism and the rising literature on Sino-Latin American economic and political relations." — Alejandro Portes, Professor of Sociology Emeritus, Princeton University and Research Professor, University of Miami

    "In examining China’s growing engagement with Latin America, Adrian H. Hearn offers a much-needed bottom-up perspective by focusing on local actors, specifically leaders and entrepreneurs of the historic Chinese communities of socialist Cuba and neoliberal Mexico.  Relying more on thick ethnography than voluminous government statistics and documents, on the significance and limitations of formal and informal “trust” in relationships than on ponderous rules and regulations, he humanizes the story and provides a rich new chapter in the history of the Chinese diaspora in Latin America and Caribbean." — Evelyn Hu-DeHart, Professor of History, American Studies, and Ethnic Studies, Brown University

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  • Description

    In Diaspora and Trust Adrian H. Hearn proposes that a new paradigm of socio-economic development is gaining importance for Cuba and Mexico. Despite their contrasting political ideologies, both countries must build new forms of trust among the state, society, and resident Chinese diaspora communities if they are to harness the potentials of China’s rise. Combining political and economic analysis with ethnographic fieldwork, Hearn analyzes Cuba's and Mexico's historical relations with China, and highlights how Chinese diaspora communities are now deepening these ties. Theorizing trust as an alternative to existing models of exchange—which are failing to navigate the world's shifting economic currents—Hearn shows how Cuba and Mexico can reformulate the balance of power between state, market, and society. A new paradigm of domestic development and foreign engagement based on trust is becoming critical for Cuba, Mexico, and other countries seeking to benefit from China’s growing economic power and social influence.

    About The Author(s)

    Adrian H. Hearn is Associate Professor of Spanish and Latin American Studies at the University of Melbourne and the author of Cuba: Religion, Social Capital, and Development, also published by Duke University Press.
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