• Purchase of print on-demand copies is handled and fulfilled directly through Sheridan Custom Publishing. Print on-demand checkout does not occur on the Duke University Press site. Any items marked for checkout on the Duke University Press site will remain in your bag.

  • 1. Disaster, Crisis, Revolution–Eric Cazdyn

    2. Detroit: Disaster Deferred, Disaster In Progress–Jerry Herron

    3. No Shelter From The Storm–Carol A. Stabile

    4. When Disaster Is A Bureaucrat–Isobel S. Frye

    5. Postcolonial Failure And The Politics Of Nation–Peter Hitchcock

    6. Politicizing Weather: Two Polish Cases Of The Intersection Between Politics And Weather–Leszek Koczanowicz

    7. Disastrous Accumulation–Neil Smith

    8. Public Health Preparedness: Social Control Or Social Justice?–Steve Wing and Leah Schinasi

    9. System Failure: Oil, Futurity, and the Anticipation Of Disaster–Imre Szeman

    10. Incoming: Globalization, Disaster, Poetics–Walter Kalaidjian

    11. Introduction To Isozaki Arata’s “City Demolition Industry, Inc.” and “Rumor City”–Fredric Jameson

    12. City Demolition Industry, Inc.–Isozaki Arata

    13. Rumor City–Isozaki Arata

    14. Notes On Contributors

  • Permission to Photocopy (coursepacks)

    If you are requesting permission to photocopy material for classroom use, please contact the Copyright Clearance Center at copyright.com;

    If the Copyright Clearance Center cannot grant permission, you may request permission from our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Permission to Reprint

    If you are requesting permission to reprint DUP material (journal or book selection) in another book or in any other format, contact our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Images/Art

    Many images/art used in material copyrighted by Duke University Press are controlled, not by the Press, but by the owner of the image. Please check the credit line adjacent to the illustration, as well as the front and back matter of the book for a list of credits. You must obtain permission directly from the owner of the image. Occasionally, Duke University Press controls the rights to maps or other drawings. Please direct permission requests for these images to permissions@dukeupress.edu.
    For book covers to accompany reviews, please contact the publicity department.

    Subsidiary Rights/Foreign Translations

    If you're interested in a Duke University Press book for subsidiary rights/translations, please contact permissions@dukeupress.edu. Include the book title/author, rights sought, and estimated print run.

    Disability Requests

    Instructions for requesting an electronic text on behalf of a student with disabilities are available here.

    Rights & Permissions Contact Information

    Email: permissions@dukeupress.edu
    Email contact for coursepacks: asstpermissions@dukeupress.edu
    Fax: 919-688-4574
    Mail:
    Duke University Press
    Rights and Permissions
    905 W. Main Street
    Suite 18B
    Durham, NC 27701

    For all requests please include:
    1. Author's name. If book has an editor that is different from the article author, include editor's name also.
    2. Title of the journal article or book chapter and title of journal or title of book
    3. Page numbers (if excerpting, provide specifics)
    For coursepacks, please also note: The number of copies requested, the school and professor requesting
    For reprints and subsidiary rights, please also note: Your volume title, publication date, publisher, print run, page count, rights sought
  • Description

    The past few years have seen numerous natural disasters, from the 2004 tsunami in Southeast Asia to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. Many believe that these disasters will only increase as global warming intensifies. This special issue of SAQ examines the political and social problems that underlie and exacerbate the effects of disasters, be they natural or man-made.

    From the fields of anthropology, architecture, cultural studies, economics, epidemiology, journalism, and philosophy, the contributors argue that disasters do not only follow from things going horribly wrong (extreme weather, economic collapse, urban decay). Often they are the predictable results of things going according to plan. The meaning of disaster itself is challenged, theorized again, and reconceptualized.

    One essay argues that media reports during Hurricane Katrina worked to deny or disguise institutionalized racism, suppressing potential dissent and controversy. Another examines how the state bureaucracy reinforces cycles of death, disease, and poverty in South Africa. A third explores the devastating conditions of everyday life in Detroit that no longer register in the political imaginary of the United States. Still another investigates the connection between unusual weather events and the workings of the Communist Party in Poland. Finally, the renowned architect Isozaki Arata plays with the idea of urban planning in two short fables introduced by Fredric Jameson.

    Contributors. Eric Cazdyn, Isobel S. Frye, Jerry Herron, Peter Hitchcock, Isozaki Arata, Fredric Jameson, Walter Kalaidjian, Leszek Koczanowicz, Leah Schinasi, Neil Smith, Carol A. Stabile, Imre Szeman, Steve Wing

Explore More

Sign up for Subject Matters email updates to receive discounts, new book announcements, and more.

Share

Create a reading list or add to an existing list. Sign-in or register now to continue.


Contact Us

  • Duke University Press
  • 905 W. Main St. Ste 18-B
  • Durham, NC 27701
  • U.S. phone (toll-free): 888-651-0122
  • International: 1-919-688-5134
  • orders@dukeupress.edu