• Domesticating Democracy: The Politics of Conflict Resolution in Bolivia

    Author(s):
    Pages: 296
    Illustrations: 17 illustrations
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
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    978-0-8223-7093-2
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    978-0-8223-7108-3
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  • Acknowledgments  ix
    Introduction  1
    Uprising  31
    1. Fix the State or Fix the People  37
    2. Cultures of Peace, Cultures of Conflict  64
    3. A Market for Mediators  95
    A Brief Recess: Conciliating Conflict in Alto Lima  121
    4. Between Compadres There Is No Interest  134
    5. The Conflictual Social Life of an Industrial Sewing Machine  163
    6. You Have to Comply with Paper  194
    Conclusion  221
    Notes  235
    References  255
    Index  275
  • "With deep insight, Susan Helen Ellison maps the confluence of U.S. investment in Bolivian democracy and liberalization policies that steepened personal debt for many Bolivians. She shows in rich detail how the alternative dispute resolution forums backed by NGOs in the name of democracy have become materially central to the form and substance of interpersonal relations. Her trenchant analysis of what she calls political intimacy is compelling, convincing, and moving—a major contribution to democracy studies." — Carol J. Greenhouse, author of, The Paradox of Relevance: Ethnography and Citizenship in the United States

    Domesticating Democracy is an original, timely, and important book. Susan Helen Ellison provides a fascinating study of alternative dispute resolution as a form of neoliberal governmentality, and her experience as intern and ethnographer in the institutions she studies shines through. Well-researched, clearly written, convincing, and full of rich ethnographic detail, this book will find an audience among anthropologists and legal scholars interested in Latin America, urban studies, and democratization.” — Daniel M. Goldstein, author of, Owners of the Sidewalk: Security and Survival in the Informal City

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  • Description

    In Domesticating Democracy Susan Helen Ellison examines foreign-funded alternate dispute resolution (ADR) organizations that provide legal aid and conflict resolution to vulnerable citizens in El Alto, Bolivia. Advocates argue that these programs help residents cope with their interpersonal disputes and economic troubles while avoiding an overburdened legal system and cumbersome state bureaucracies. Ellison shows that ADR programs do more than that—they aim to change the ways Bolivians interact with the state and with global capitalism, making them into self-reliant citizens. ADR programs frequently encourage Bolivians to renounce confrontational expressions of discontent, turning away from courtrooms, physical violence, and street protest and coming to the negotiation table. Nevertheless, residents of El Alto find creative ways to take advantage of these micro-level resources while still seeking justice and a democratic system capable of redressing the structural violence and vulnerability that ADR fails to treat.

    About The Author(s)

    Susan Ellison is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Wellesley College.
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