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  • From the Tricontinental to the Global South: Race, Radicalism, and Transnational Solidarity

    Author(s):
    Pages: 352
    Illustrations: 14 illustrations
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
  • Cloth: $99.95 - Not In Stock
    978-0-8223-7114-4
  • Paperback: $27.95 - Not In Stock
    978-0-8223-7125-0
  • “Anne Garland Mahler's From the Tricontinental to the Global South brings to life the political project of the Tricontinental, the pole of left-wing anti-imperialism of the mid-twentieth century. Cuba is at the center of this project, but so too are the dreams of people from Africa and from the Americas. Out of the Cold War emerged this powerful statement against hierarchy and in favor of equality, against racism and for humanity. Mahler’s close reading of the fundamental texts of the Tricontinental shows how central it was to the creation of an anti-imperialist imagination that struggles to remain alive in our time." — Vijay Prashad, author of, The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South

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  • Description

    In From the Tricontinental to the Global South Anne Garland Mahler traces the history and intellectual legacy of the understudied global justice movement called the Tricontinental—an alliance of liberation struggles from eighty-two countries founded in Havana in 1966. Focusing on racial violence and inequality, the Tricontinental's critique of global capitalist exploitation has influenced historical radical thought, contemporary social movements such as the World Social Forum and Black Lives Matter, and a Global South political imaginary. The movement's discourse, which circulated in four languages, also found its way into radical artistic practices, like Cuban revolutionary film and Nuyorican literature. While recent social movements have revived Tricontinentalism's ideologies and aesthetics, they have largely abandoned its roots in black internationalism and its contribution to a global struggle for racial justice. In response to this fractured appropriation of Tricontinentalism, Mahler ultimately calls contemporary solidarity politics into a renewed engagement with black internationalist thought as vital to the future of transnational political resistance.

    About The Author(s)

    Anne Garland Mahler is Assistant Professor of Spanish at the University of Virginia.
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