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  • Preface. Arrivals  xi
    Acknowledgments  xvii
    List of Abbreviations  xxi
    Introduction. Changing Climates of Colonialism  1
    Interlude 1. Every Navajo Has an Anthro  19
    1. Extractive Legacies: Histories of Diné Power   26
    2. The Rise of Energy Activism  64
    Interlude 2. Solar Power in Klagetoh  108
    3. Sovereignty's Interdependencies  113
    4. Contesting Expertise: Public Hearings on Desert Rock  149
    5. Artifacts of Energy Futures  187
    Interlude 3. Off-Grid in the Chuskas  230
    Conclusion. Conversions  236
    Epilogue. Vitalities  253
    Notes  257
    References  283
    Index
  • "In this masterful study Dana E. Powell weaves a rich narrative that intertwines Navajo leaders' efforts to reverse a depressed economy with the complexities of the political atmosphere, tribal sovereignty, the imperative to address environmental justice and climate change, and Navajo concerns about land use. Landscapes of Power is indispensable to the study of Native nations, their relationships to energy and development projects, and to understanding the Navajo nation's twenty-first-century history." — Jennifer Nez Denetdale (DinĂ©), University of New Mexico

    "Expertly tracing the legacy of the thwarted Desert Rock project, Dana E. Powell identifies an ethical project among Navajo activists that signals politics beyond straightforward environmentalism—a politics that matters for Navajo sovereignty, territory, and ethical ways of life, as well as for energy activism and policy everywhere. As with #NoDAPL and Standing Rock, the Desert Rock struggle goes to the core of what politics look like within, across, and in solidarity with Indian Country. This is essential reading." — Jessica R. Cattelino, author of, High Stakes: Florida Seminole Gaming and Sovereignty

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  • Description

    In Landscapes of Power Dana E. Powell examines the rise and fall of the controversial Desert Rock Power Plant initiative in New Mexico to trace the political conflicts surrounding native sovereignty and contemporary energy development on Navajo (Diné) Nation land. Powell's historical and ethnographic account shows how the coal-fired power plant project's defeat provided the basis for redefining the legacies of colonialism, mineral extraction, and environmentalism. Examining the labor of activists, artists, politicians, elders, technicians, and others, Powell emphasizes the generative potential of Navajo resistance to articulate a vision of autonomy in the face of twenty-first-century colonial conditions. Ultimately, Powell situates local Navajo struggles over energy technology and infrastructure within broader sociocultural life, debates over global climate change, and tribal, federal, and global politics of extraction.

    About The Author(s)

    Dana E. Powell is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Appalachian State University.
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