• Mothering through Precarity: Women's Work and Digital Media

    Author(s): ,
    Pages: 232
    Illustrations: 11 illustrations
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
  • Cloth: $89.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-6336-1
  • Paperback: $24.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-6347-7
  • Quantity
  • Add To Bag
  • Acknowledgments  ix
    Introduction. The Digital Mundane: Mothering, Media, and Precarity  1
    1. Mother Loads: Why "Good" Mothers Are Anxious  31
    2. Mamapreneurialism: Family Appreciation in the Digital Mundane  65
    3. Digital Entanglements: Staying Happy in the Mamasphere  103
    4. Individualized Solidarities: Privatizing Happiness Together  137
    Conclusion. Socializing Happiness (or, Why We Wrote an Unhappy Book)  169
    Afterword. Packets and Pockets  185
    Notes  189
    Bibliography  205
    Index  213
  • "... women, with children or without, have a lot to gain from this smart, insightful work. It outlines a nagging problem so specific I lacked a clear definition of it before I started reading.... It’s an idea rooted directly in our dominant political ideology, one that many cannot name: neoliberalism."

    "Mothering through Precarity ... richly illustrates what a theoretically, conceptually and emotionally confused and paradoxical situation women are in with respect to an online world that offers family-enhancing information and advice, communicative solace and flexible income-earning opportunities, but also exploits their ongoing efforts at maintaining a positive family environment by creating new anxieties and offering meagre financial returns.... After reading this book, it is not so difficult to understand why some women in the Rust Belt voted for Donald Trump’s media-fuelled promises of a better future."
     

    "Mothering through Precarity is at its best when it demonstrates digital media as a crucial mechanism by which mothers daily discipline themselves to feel ever more optimistic and upbeat in spite of the pervasive uncertainty they feel.... Suitable for undergraduate and graduate courses at the intersection of family, gender, and media, we recommend this book, and in particular chapter three and the Conclusion, for sections highlighting the use of digital media in families."
     

    Reviews

  • "... women, with children or without, have a lot to gain from this smart, insightful work. It outlines a nagging problem so specific I lacked a clear definition of it before I started reading.... It’s an idea rooted directly in our dominant political ideology, one that many cannot name: neoliberalism."

    "Mothering through Precarity ... richly illustrates what a theoretically, conceptually and emotionally confused and paradoxical situation women are in with respect to an online world that offers family-enhancing information and advice, communicative solace and flexible income-earning opportunities, but also exploits their ongoing efforts at maintaining a positive family environment by creating new anxieties and offering meagre financial returns.... After reading this book, it is not so difficult to understand why some women in the Rust Belt voted for Donald Trump’s media-fuelled promises of a better future."
     

    "Mothering through Precarity is at its best when it demonstrates digital media as a crucial mechanism by which mothers daily discipline themselves to feel ever more optimistic and upbeat in spite of the pervasive uncertainty they feel.... Suitable for undergraduate and graduate courses at the intersection of family, gender, and media, we recommend this book, and in particular chapter three and the Conclusion, for sections highlighting the use of digital media in families."
     

  • "Motherhood and mothering—a vexed feminist issue, a central form of invisible labor along vectors of race and class, a capitalist invention, a digital community, a source of affect, love, and often pain. The remarkable Mothering through Precarity manages to parse all these dimensions and more, with insight, intelligence, and compassion. Connecting capitalist economies with networks of care, Julie A. Wilson and Emily Chivers Yochim have produced a brilliant, compelling book, one that refuses easy generalizations about what it means to be a mother in uncertain neoliberal times." — Sarah Banet-Weiser, author of, Authenticâ„¢: The Politics of Ambivalence in a Brand Culture

    "Julie A. Wilson and Emily Chivers Yochim provide a highly compelling commentary on the state of motherhood in the present moment, infused as it is with technologies and concerns about emotional and economic precarity. Making a strong (if depressing) case for the failure of the nuclear family project in the context of neoliberalism, their beautifully executed work helps us to think about labor and affect theory in new ways." — Brenda R. Weber, editor of, Reality Gendervision: Sexuality and Gender on Transatlantic Reality Television

  • Permission to Photocopy (coursepacks)

    If you are requesting permission to photocopy material for classroom use, please contact the Copyright Clearance Center at copyright.com;

    If the Copyright Clearance Center cannot grant permission, you may request permission from our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Permission to Reprint

    If you are requesting permission to reprint DUP material (journal or book selection) in another book or in any other format, contact our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Images/Art

    Many images/art used in material copyrighted by Duke University Press are controlled, not by the Press, but by the owner of the image. Please check the credit line adjacent to the illustration, as well as the front and back matter of the book for a list of credits. You must obtain permission directly from the owner of the image. Occasionally, Duke University Press controls the rights to maps or other drawings. Please direct permission requests for these images to permissions@dukeupress.edu.
    For book covers to accompany reviews, please contact the publicity department.

    Subsidiary Rights/Foreign Translations

    If you're interested in a Duke University Press book for subsidiary rights/translations, please contact permissions@dukeupress.edu. Include the book title/author, rights sought, and estimated print run.

    Disability Requests

    Instructions for requesting an electronic text on behalf of a student with disabilities are available here.

    Rights & Permissions Contact Information

    Email: permissions@dukeupress.edu
    Email contact for coursepacks: asstpermissions@dukeupress.edu
    Fax: 919-688-4574
    Mail:
    Duke University Press
    Rights and Permissions
    905 W. Main Street
    Suite 18B
    Durham, NC 27701

    For all requests please include:
    1. Author's name. If book has an editor that is different from the article author, include editor's name also.
    2. Title of the journal article or book chapter and title of journal or title of book
    3. Page numbers (if excerpting, provide specifics)
    For coursepacks, please also note: The number of copies requested, the school and professor requesting
    For reprints and subsidiary rights, please also note: Your volume title, publication date, publisher, print run, page count, rights sought
  • Description

    In Mothering through Precarity Julie A. Wilson and Emily Chivers Yochim explore how working- and middle-class mothers negotiate the difficulties of twenty-first-century mothering through their everyday engagement with digital media. From Facebook and Pinterest to couponing, health, and parenting websites, the women Wilson and Yochim study rely upon online resources and communities for material and emotional support. Feeling responsible for their family's economic security, these women often become "mamapreneurs," running side businesses out of their homes. They also feel the need to provide for their family's happiness, making successful mothering dependent upon economic and emotional labor. Questioning these standards of motherhood, Wilson and Yochim demonstrate that mothers' work is inseparable from digital media as it provides them the means for sustaining their families through such difficulties as health scares, underfunded schools, a weakening social safety net, and job losses.

    About The Author(s)

    Julie A. Wilson is Assistant Professor of Communication Arts and Theatre at Allegheny College.

    Emily Chivers Yochim is Associate Professor of Communication Arts and Theatre at Allegheny College and the author of Skate Life: Re-Imagining White Masculinity.
Fall 2017
Explore More
Share

Create a reading list or add to an existing list. Sign-in or register now to continue.


Contact Us

  • Duke University Press
  • 905 W. Main St. Ste 18-B
  • Durham, NC 27701
  • U.S. phone (toll-free): 888-651-0122
  • International: 1-919-688-5134
  • orders@dukeupress.edu