• Postcolonial Grief: The Afterlives of the Pacific Wars in the Americas

    Author(s):
    Pages: 200
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
  • Cloth: $89.95 - In Stock
    978-1-4780-0135-5
  • Paperback: $23.95 - In Stock
    978-1-4780-0293-2
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  • Acknowledgments  vii
    Introduction. Mourning Empire  1
    1. Melancholy Violence: Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth and Hisaye Yamamato's "A Fire in Fontana"  23
    2. Haunting Absence: Racial Cognitive Mapping, Interregnum, and the Los Angeles Riots of 1992  41
    3. Transpacific Noir, Dying Colonialism  66
    4. Destined for Death: Antigone along the Pacific Rim  88
    Epilogue. Watery Graves  110
    Notes  115
    Bibliography  153
    Index  175
  • “This tour de force exhumes the ghosts of the American Century built on the ruins of Japanese imperialism. Postcolonial Grief powerfully names the repetition compulsion of producing an Asian figure who must be continually rescued and destroyed, leaving postwar violence and loss in the transpacific unmourned. Jinah Kim's bold and illuminating study asks us to confront the painful political fact that decolonization in the transpacific is yet to come.” — David L. Eng, coauthor of, Racial Melancholia, Racial Dissociation: On the Social and Psychic Lives of Asian Americans

    “Guided by a longue durée analysis of multiple settler colonialisms, Postcolonial Grief is a highly original, timely, and welcome project that takes seriously the transpacific turn in comparative ethnic studies, critical race studies, and Asian American studies. This provocative book will undoubtedly have a great impact on the ways that scholars view war, memory, grieving, and empire.” — Cathy J. Schlund-Vials, author of, War, Genocide, and Justice: Cambodian American Memory Work

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  • Description

    In Postcolonial Grief Jinah Kim explores the relationship of mourning to transpacific subjectivities, aesthetics, and decolonial politics since World War II. Kim argues that Asian diasporic subjectivity exists in relation to afterlives because the deaths of those killed by U.S. imperialism and militarism in the Pacific remain unresolved and unaddressed. Kim shows how primarily U.S.-based Korean and Japanese diasporic writers, artists, and filmmakers negotiate the necropolitics of Asia and how their creative refusal to heal from imperial violence may generate transformative antiracist and decolonial politics. She contests prevalent interpretations of melancholia by engaging with Frantz Fanon's and Hisaye Yamamoto's decolonial writings; uncovering the noir genre's relationship to the U.S. war in Korea; discussing the emergence of silenced colonial histories during the 1992 Los Angeles riots; and analyzing the 1996 hostage takeover of the Japanese ambassador's home in Peru. Kim highlights how the aesthetic and creative work of the Japanese and Korean diasporas offers new insights into twenty-first-century concerns surrounding the state's erasure of military violence and colonialism and the difficult work of remembering histories of war across the transpacific.

    About The Author(s)

    Jinah Kim is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies at California State University, Northridge.
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