• Preface to the Third Edition vii

    1. Loving the Academic's Vocation, Institutions and All: A Retrospective Appreciation of the Colloquium on The Academic's Handbook / L. Gregory Jones 1

    Part I. The Academy and the Academic

    2. Faculty in the Variety of American Colleges and Universities / Jerry G. Graff 11

    3. Small is . . . Different: A Guide for Newcomers to Small Colleges / Samuel Schuman 22

    4. The Morality of Teaching / Stanley Hauwerwas 38

    5. Women in Academia (With Updated Afterword) / Emily Toth 47

    6. Minority Faculty in (Mainstream White) Academia / Nellie Y. McKay 62

    Part II. Some Issues in the Academy Today

    7. Fads and Fashions on Campus: Interdisciplinarity and Internationalization / Craufurd D. Goodwin 79

    8. Free Speech and Academic Freedom / Ronald R. Butters 87

    9. Anticipating and Avoiding Misperceptions of Harassment 98

    10. The Responsible Conduct of Academic Research / P. Aarne Vesilind 112

    Part III. Academic Employment

    11. On Getting a Job / Henry M. Wilbur 123

    12. The Job Market: An Overview / Sudhir Shetty 136

    13. Off-Track Vetting / John G. Cross and Edie N. Goldenberg 144

    14. The Tenure System / Matthew W. Finkin 155

    15. Some Tips on Getting Tenure / Craufurd D. Goodwin 168

    16. Academic Salaries and Benefits / A. Leigh DeNeef 176

    Part IV. Teaching and Advising

    17. The Nuts and Bolts of Running a Lecture Course / Norman L. Christensen 203

    18. Why I Teach by Discussion / Anne Firor Scott 212

    19. New Faculty Members and Advising / Elizabeth Studley Nathans 217

    20. Some Thoughts on Faculty Mentoring / A. Leigh DeNeef 229

    21. Considering the Impact of Technology in Teaching and Learning / Patrick M. Murphy 236

    Part V. Funding Academic Research

    22. Corporate Relations and Foundation Fundraising / Beth A. Eastlick and Zachary B. Robbins 251

    23. Securing Funding from Federal Sources / Judith K. Argon 260

    24. New Academics and the Quest for Private Funds / Fred E. Crossland 278

    Part VI. Publishing Research

    25. On Writing Scholarly Articles / Louis J. Budd 291

    26. Publishing in Science / Boyd R. Strain 306

    27. Academic Book Publishing / Cathy N. Davidson and Ken Wissoker 315

    28. The Modern Research Library / Deborah L. Jakubs and Paul L. Conway 334

    Part VII. Academic Communities and Administrations

    29. University Governance and Autonomy: Who Decides What in the University / A. Kenneth Pye 349

    30. The Role of the Department in the Groves of Academe / Joel Colton 367

    31. The Academic Community / Philip Stewart 387

    Selected Further Readings 395

    Contributors 399

    Index 403
  • L. Gregory Jones

    Jerry G. Gaff

    Samuel Schuman

    Stanley Hauerwas

    Emily Toth

    Nellie McKay

    Craufurd D. Goodwin

    Ronald R. Butters

    Judith S. White

    P. Aarne Vesilind

    Henry M. Wilbur

    Sudhir Shetty

    John G. Cross

    Matthew W. Finkin

    A. Leigh DeNeef

    Norman L. Christensen

    Anne Firor Scott

    Elizabeth Studley Nathans

    Patrick D. Murphy

    Beth A. Eastlick

    Judith Argon

    Fred E. Crossland

    Louis J. Budd

    Boyd R. Strain

    Cathy N. Davidson

    Ken Wissoker

    Deborah Jakubs

    A. Kenneth Pye

    Joel Colton

    Philip Stewart

    Christopher Kennedy

    Edie Goldenberg

    Zachary B. Robbins

    Paul L. Conway

  • “[E]ven experienced academics and senior scholars will find many sections of this book thought provoking and engaging. , , , [T]he editors have done an admirable job of carefully crafting a revised edition that reflects the trends and changes in higher education. . . . Many misconceptions about the profession and about what professors do could be avoided were graduate programs to give each student a copy of this book. The book should also be on the shelves of college and university libraries of all sizes. While it is sometimes said that there is no one busier than a first-year faculty member, this is one book that just such a person will find hard to put down.”

    “This rather meaty volume, now in its third printing (the first edition debuted about 20 years ago) considers everything a budding academic should know about professorial life. It’s aimed primarily at newly-minted Ph.D.s who’ve just landed on the shores of academe, but it also speaks to graduate students ready to shove off. In this sense, it’s both a primer and a warning shot across the bow.”

    Reviews

  • “[E]ven experienced academics and senior scholars will find many sections of this book thought provoking and engaging. , , , [T]he editors have done an admirable job of carefully crafting a revised edition that reflects the trends and changes in higher education. . . . Many misconceptions about the profession and about what professors do could be avoided were graduate programs to give each student a copy of this book. The book should also be on the shelves of college and university libraries of all sizes. While it is sometimes said that there is no one busier than a first-year faculty member, this is one book that just such a person will find hard to put down.”

    “This rather meaty volume, now in its third printing (the first edition debuted about 20 years ago) considers everything a budding academic should know about professorial life. It’s aimed primarily at newly-minted Ph.D.s who’ve just landed on the shores of academe, but it also speaks to graduate students ready to shove off. In this sense, it’s both a primer and a warning shot across the bow.”

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  • Description

    This new, revised, and expanded edition of the popular Academic’s Handbook is an essential guide for those planning or beginning an academic career.

    Faculty members, administrators, and professionals with experience at all levels of higher education offer candid, practical advice to help beginning academics understand matters including:
    — The different kinds of institutions of higher learning and expectations of faculty at each.
    — The advantages and disadvantages of teaching at four-year colleges instead of research universities.
    — The ins and outs of the job market.
    — Alternatives to tenure-track, research-oriented positions.
    — Salary and benefits.
    — The tenure system.
    — Pedagogy in both large lecture courses and small, discussion-based seminars.
    — The difficulties facing women and minorities within academia.
    — Corporations, foundations, and the federal government as potential sources of research funds.
    — The challenges of faculty mentoring.
    — The impact of technology on contemporary teaching and learning.
    — Different types of publishers and the publishing process at university presses.
    — The modern research library.
    — The structure of university governance.
    — The role of departments within the university.

    With the inclusion of eight new chapters, this edition of The Academic’s Handbook is designed to ease the transition from graduate school to a well-rounded and rewarding career.

    Contributors. Judith K. Argon, Louis J. Budd, Ronald R. Butters, Norman L. Christensen, Joel Colton, Paul L. Conway, John G. Cross, Fred E. Crossland, Cathy N. Davidson, A. Leigh DeNeef, Beth A. Eastlick, Matthew W. Finkin, Jerry G. Gaff, Edie N. Goldenberg, Craufurd D. Goodwin, Stanley M. Hauerwas, Deborah L. Jakubs, L. Gregory Jones, Nellie Y. McKay, Patrick M. Murphy, Elizabeth Studley Nathans, A. Kenneth Pye, Zachary B. Robbins, Anne Firor Scott, Sudhir Shetty, Samuel Schuman, Philip Stewart, Boyd R. Strain, Emily Toth, P. Aarne Vesilind, Judith S. White, Henry M. Wilbur, Ken Wissoker

    About The Author(s)

    A. Leigh DeNeef is Professor of English at Duke University. He was Associate Dean of the Graduate School at Duke for more than twenty years.

    Craufurd D. Goodwin is the James B. Duke Professor of Economics at Duke University, where he has served as Vice Provost, Dean of the Graduate School, and Acting Chair of the Economics Department.

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