• The New History in an Old Museum: Creating the Past at Colonial Williamsburg

    Author(s): ,
    Pages: 272
    Illustrations: 18 b&w photographs
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
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    978-0-8223-1978-8
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    978-0-8223-1974-0
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  • Acknowledgments ix

    1. The New History in an Old Museum 3

    2. Imag[in]ing Colonial Williamsburg 28

    3. Why History Changes, or, Two Theories of History Making 50

    4. Just the Facts 78

    5. Social History on the Ground 102

    6. The Company Line: Aspects of Corporate Culture at Colonial Williamsburg 125

    7. The Front Line: Smile Free or Die 170

    8. Picket Lines 208

    9. The Bottom Line 220

    Notes 237

    Works Cited 249

    Index 258





  • “A study quite unlike anything I’ve ever seen: in its depth of research, breadth of conception, theoretical sophistication, and incisiveness of judgment, it seems to me unmatched.”—Peter Novick, University of Chicago — N/A

    “In this impressive ethnography of Williamsburg, Handler and Gable take us behind the scenes and show us the roles of professional historians, front-line interpreters, corporate officials, and service workers in shaping the portrait of eighteenth-century Virginia that is presented. I know of no other book that presents such a complete and complex portrait of the museum as a social, economic, and cultural institution.”—Roy Rosenzweig, George Mason University — N/A

    “This manuscript is a deep and original work of cultural critique. It will go a long way in improving the image of cultural studies scholarship among historians, anthropologists, and others, who hold it in suspicion. I am sure this study will be much cited as such an exemplar in several fields.”—George E. Marcus, Rice University — N/A

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  • Description

    The New History in an Old Museum is an exploration of "historical truth" as presented at Colonial Williamsburg. More than a detailed history of a museum and tourist attraction, it examines the packaging of American history, and consumerism and the manufacturing of cultural beliefs. Through extensive fieldwork—including numerous site visits, interviews with employees and visitors, and archival research—Richard Handler and Eric Gable illustrate how corporate sensibility blends with pedagogical principle in Colonial Williamsburg to blur the lines between education and entertainment, patriotism and revisionism.
    During much of its existence, the "living museum" at Williamsburg has been considered a patriotic shrine, celebrating the upscale lifestyles of Virginia’s colonial-era elite. But in recent decades a new generation of social historians has injected a more populist and critical slant to the site’s narrative of nationhood. For example, in interactions with museum visitors, employees now relate stories about the experiences of African Americans and women, stories that several years ago did not enter into descriptions of life in Colonial Williamsburg. Handler and Gable focus on the way this public history is managed, as historians and administrators define historiographical policy and middle-level managers train and direct front-line staff to deliver this "product" to the public. They explore how visitors consume or modify what they hear and see, and reveal how interpreters and craftspeople resist or acquiesce in being managed. By deploying the voices of these various actors in a richly textured narrative, The New History in an Old Museum highlights the elements of cultural consensus that emerge from this cacophony of conflict and negotiation.

    About The Author(s)

    Richard Handler is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Virginia.

    Eric Gable is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at Mary Washington College.

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