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  • 1. Being Black There: Racial Subjectivity and Temporality in Walter Mosley's Detective Novels—Daylanne K. English

    2. Global Lukács—Jed Esty

    3. Jane Austen's Periods—Mary A. Favret

    4. "No Such Thing as Action": William Godwin, the Decision, and the Secret—Penny Fielding

    5. Symptomatology and the Novel—Jennifer L. Fleissner

    6. Photographic Fictions—Kate Flint

    7. Where in the World Did Kamala Markandaya Go?—Rosemary Marangoly George

    8. Narratives of Survival—Michal Peled Ginsburg

    9. Unorthodox Chronologies, Secret Histories: The Novel and the Critique of Historicism—David Glover

    10. Close Reading at a Distance: Bleak House—Daniel Hack

    11. The Doctrine of Survivals, the Great Mutiny, and Lady Audley's Secret—Christopher Herbert

    12. Law, Parody, and the Politics of African American Literary History—Gene Andrew Jarrett

    13. The Early Novel and Catastrophe—Scott J. Juengel

    14. Some Body's Story: The Novel as Instrument—Meegan Kennedy

    15. Natural History and the Novel: Dilatoriness and Length and the Nineteenth-Century Novel of Everyday Life—Amy M. King

    16. Arrow of God and the World on Paper—Neil Ten Kortenaar

    17. Pitying the Sheep in Far from the Madding Crowd—Ivan Kreilkamp

    18. History and the Work of Literature in the Periphery—Sanjay Krishnan

    19. Abstraction and the Subject of Novel Reading: Drifting through Romola—David Kurnick

    20. Novel (Sapphic) Subjects: The Sexual History of Form—Susan S. Lanser

    21. There's Something about Hyde—Jules Law

    22. Reading Time—Michael Levenson

    23. Narrative Networks: Bleak House and the Affordances of Form—Caroline Levine

    24. Fiction and State Crisis—John Marx

    25. Transnationalism and the Novel: A Call for Periodization—Mary Helen McMurran

    26. The Sociology of the Novel: George Eliot's Strangers—Gage McWeeny

    27. Arts of Homelessness: Roberto Bolaño or the Commodification of Exile—Alberto Medina

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  • Description

    Theories of the Novel Now, Parts I, II, and III (42:2, 42:3, 43:1)
    These three issues commemorate the fortieth anniversary of Novel and bring scholarship from various literary disciplines into conversation around theoretical issues common to novel studies.

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