• Write Now: American Literature in the 1980s and 1990s

    An issue of: American Literature
    Volume: 68
    Issue: 1
    Pages: 316
  • Paperback: $14.00 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-6437-5
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  • 1. Preface: Write Now: American Literature in the 1980s and 1990–Sharon O'Brien

    2. Books and Silence–Jonathan Strong

    3. f-Words: An Essay on the Essay–Rachel Blau DuPlessis

    4. Alice Walker's The Temple of My Familiar as Pastiche–Bonnie Braendlin

    5. Art Spiegelman's Maus: Graphic Art and the Holocaust–Thomas Doherty

    6. Food, Sex, and Betrayal–Miriam Levine

    7. Reservation Home Movies: Sherman Alexie's Poetry–Jennifer Gillan

    8. Nothing Left to Lose: Housekeeping's Strange Freedoms–Christine Caver

    9. Resignifying Autobiography: Lyn Hejinian's My Life–Juliana Spahr

    10. "Standing At The Corner Of Walk And Don't Walk": Vintage Contemporaries, Bright Lights, Big City, and the Problems of betweenness–Stephanie Girard

    11. Heart's Blood–Robert Olmstead

    12. "How to Live. What to do.": The Poetics and Politics of AIDS–Deborah Landau

    Book Reviews

    13. The Cambridge History of American Literature, Volume I: 1590-1820 by Sacvan Bercovitch–Carla Mulford

    14. Authorizing the Past: The Rhetoric of History in Seventeenth-Century New England by Stephen Carl Arch–Bernard Rosenthal

    15. The Philosophy of Jonathan Edwards: A Study in Divine Semiotics by Stephen H. Daniel–Christopher Grasso

    16. American Women Writers and the Work of History, 1790-1860 by Nina Baym–Sharon M. Harris

    17. That Pale Mother Rising: Sentimental Discourses and the Imitation of Motherhood in Nineteenth-Century America by Eva Cherniavsky–Michelle Burnham

    18. Parables of Possibility: The American Need for Beginnings by Terence Martin–Armida Gilbert

    19. The First Woman in the Republic: A Cultural Biography of Lydia Maria Child by Carolyn L. Karcher–Dana D. Nelson

    20. Cultural Reformations: Lydia Maria Child and the Literature of Reform by Bruce Mills–Marilyn M. Wilton

    21. Philosophical Passages: Wittgenstein, Emerson, Austin, Derrida by Stanley Cavell–Martin Kevorkian

    22. The Civil War World of Herman Melville by Stanton Garner–Robert Milder

    23. Melville and Repose: The Rhetoric of Humor in the American Renaissance by John Bryant–Elizabeth Huyck

    24. Melville's Art of Democracy by Nancy Fredricks–Bruce L. Grenberg

    25. Melville and the Politics of Identity: From "King Lear" to "Moby-Dick” by Julian Markels–Linck C. Johnson

    26. Mark Twain on the Loose: A Comic Writer and the American Self by Bruce Michelson–Louis J. Budd

    27. Acting Naturally: Mark Twain in the Culture of Performance by Randall Knoper–Gregg Camfield

    28. The Fictional Republic: Horatio Alger and American Political Discourse by Carol Nackenoff–Charles L. Crow

    29. Transcendent Daughters in Jewett's "Country of the Pointed Firs” by Joseph Church–Victoria Brehm

    30. Charlotte Perkins Gilman: Her Progress Toward Utopia with Selected Writings by Carol Farley Kessler–Dale Bauer

    31. Terrible Honesty: Mongrel Manhattan in the 1920s by Ann Douglas–Chip Rhodes

    32. Howard Mumford Jones and the Dynamics of Liberal Humanism by Peter Brier–Paul Hansom

    33. The "Other" New York Jewish Intellectuals by Carole S. Kessner–Peter Powers

    34. Out of Line: History, Psychoanalysis, and Montage in H. D.'s Long Poems by Susan Edmunds–Hilary Holladay

    35. Modernism from Right to Left: Wallace Stevens, the Thirties, and Literary Radicalism by Alan Filreis–David H. Hesla

    36. The Frost Family's Adventure in Poetry: Sheer Morning Gladn

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  • Description

    Write Now speculates on some of the dominant literary and critical trends in contemporary American literature, bringing together writers and critics in a volume that shows how literature engages both the mind and the heart. The essays in this collection show that today’s writers are blurring the lines between genres, challenging the boundaries that distinguish fiction from nonfiction, memoir from biography, essay from poetry, and autobiography from criticism.

    Contributors explore many of the relationships now shaping American literature and criticism, including the tensions between postmodernist playfulness and autobiographical earnestness, art and commerce, and politics and aesthetics. Novelists Miriam Levine, Robert Olmstead, and Jonathan Strong offers essays on their creative processes and discuss the imaginative and emotional mysteries of writing and reading. Essays on Alice Walker, Art Spiegelman, Marilynne Robinson, and AIDS literature examine how the act of writing is linked to themes of longing, discovery, desire, and betrayal.

    In evaluating both familiar and rarely studied contemporary literature from the standpoint of practicing writers as well as critics, this volume challenges the literary politics that silence critics as well as writers and testifies to the power of silent works to speak aloud. Certain to spark conversations about the politics of scholarship on current American writing, Write Now will be of interest to teachers and scholars of creative writing and American literary studies, those engaged in the arts of writing and literary criticism, and readers of contemporary American literature.

    Contributors. Bonnie Braendlin, Christine Caver, Thomas Doherty, Rachel Blau DePlessis, Jennifer Gillan, Stephanie Girard, Deborah Landau, Miriam Levine, Sharon O’Brien, Robert Olmstead, Juliana Spahr, Jonathan Strong

Fall 2017
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