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  • Acknowledgments  ix
    Introduction  1
    1. "The White Ghetto": Sexual Deviancy, Police Accountability, and the 1960s War on Poverty  35
    2. Butterflies, Whistles, and Fists: Safe Streets Patrols and Militant Gay Liberalism in the 1970s  81
    3. "Count the Contradictions": Challenges to Gay Gentrification at the Start of the Reagan Era  117
    4. Visibility and Victimization: Hate Crime Laws and the Geography of Punishment, 1980s and 1990s  155
    5. "Canaries of the Creative Age": Queer Critiques of Risk and Real Estate in the Twenty-First Century  185
    Conclusion  221
    Epilogue  227
    Appendix: Neighborhood Maps of New York and San Francisco  231
    Notes  233
    Bibliography  315
    Index  335
  • “This is a deep and intriguing study of what neighborhood and safety have meant—and seemed to mean—to different facets of the gay community at different times in its development in the period following WWII. . . . While obviously written for an academic audience, Safe Space will be accessible to most readers, and offers some insights into ways that gay spaces may not have been quite what we thought they were.”
    Kel Munger, Lit/Rant

    Reviews

  • “This is a deep and intriguing study of what neighborhood and safety have meant—and seemed to mean—to different facets of the gay community at different times in its development in the period following WWII. . . . While obviously written for an academic audience, Safe Space will be accessible to most readers, and offers some insights into ways that gay spaces may not have been quite what we thought they were.”
    Kel Munger, Lit/Rant

  • "Safe Space is a pathbreaking book for the interdisciplinary fields of queer studies and American studies. Offering a trenchant account of the stakes of gay (and sometimes lesbian) claims to urban geographies, this carefully researched history unsettles many of the heroic assumptions driving the current politics of sexual identity in the U.S. It will make a crucial intervention in a number of scholarly and activist debates."—Siobhan B. Somerville, author of Queering the Color Line: Race and the Invention of Homosexuality in American Culture

    "A wonderful book that bursts through the usual boundaries of gay history. Christina B. Hanhardt weaves class, race, and sexuality tightly together in her urban history of the last fifty years and, in doing so, succeeds in upsetting much of the conventional wisdom about the gay movement and gay politics. Her analysis implicitly calls for the revival of a multi–issue, intersectional queer politics that challenges injustice of every sort and sees them all as linked."—John D'Emilio, author of The World Turned: Essays on Gay History, Politics, and Culture

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  • Description

    Since the 1970s, a key goal of lesbian and gay activists has been protection against street violence, especially in gay neighborhoods. During the same time, policymakers and private developers declared the containment of urban violence to be a top priority. In this important book, Christina B. Hanhardt examines how LGBT calls for "safe space" have been shaped by broader public safety initiatives that have sought solutions in policing and privatization and have had devastating effects along race and class lines.

    Drawing on extensive archival and ethnographic research in New York City and San Francisco, Hanhardt traces the entwined histories of LGBT activism, urban development, and U.S. policy in relation to poverty and crime over the past fifty years. She highlights the formation of a mainstream LGBT movement, as well as the very different trajectories followed by radical LGBT and queer grassroots organizations. Placing LGBT activism in the context of shifting liberal and neoliberal policies, Safe Space is a groundbreaking exploration of the contradictory legacies of the LGBT struggle for safety in the city.

    About The Author(s)

    Christina B. Hanhardt is Associate Professor of American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park.

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