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  • Abject Performances: Aesthetic Strategies in Latino Cultural Production

    Author(s):
    Pages: 240
    Illustrations: 69 illustrations, including 10 in color
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
    Series: Dissident Acts
  • Cloth: $89.95 - Not In Stock
    978-0-8223-7063-5
  • Paperback: $24.95 - Not In Stock
    978-0-8223-7078-9
  • “In this provocative text, Leticia Alvarado offers us abjection as an aesthetic strategy for thinking about embodied performances that bear the weight of the fraught communal failures of latinidad. Her eclectic archive of formal and informal performances of world-making practices draw her readers toward those improper subjects of Latino cultural production that expose the perverse pleasures of refusing both civic incorporation and identitarian regimes to linger in the difficult promise of racialized otherness.” — Juana María Rodríguez, author of, Sexual Futures, Queer Gestures, and Other Latina Longings

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  • Description

    In Abject Performances, Leticia Alvarado draws out the irreverent, disruptive aesthetic strategies used by Latino artists and cultural producers who shun standards of respectability that are typically used to conjure concrete minority identities. In place of works imbued with pride, redemption, or celebration, artists such as Ana Mendieta, Nao Bustamante, and the Chicano art collective known as Asco employ negative affects—shame, disgust, and unbelonging—to capture experiences that lie at the edge of the mainstream, inspirational Latino-centered social justice struggles. Drawing from a diverse expressive archive that ranges from performance art to performative testimonies of personal faith-based subjection, Alvarado illuminates modes of community formation and social critique defined by a refusal of identitarian coherence that nonetheless coalesce into Latino affiliation and possibility.

    About The Author(s)

    Leticia Alvarado is Assistant Professor of American Studies at Brown University.
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