• Cloth: $94.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-5736-0
  • Paperback: $25.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-5751-3
  • Quantity
  • Add To Bag
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix

    Introduction. The Ear and the Voice in the Lettered City's Geophysical History 1

    1. On Howls and Pitches 31

    2. On Popular Song 77

    3. On the Ethnographic Ear 123

    4. On Vocal Immunity 165

    Epilogue. The Oral in the Aural 207

    Notes 215

    References 231

    Index 252
  • Co-Winner, 2015 Alan Merriam Prize, presented by the Society for Ethnomusicology

  • "Speaking from the intersection of sound studies, Latin American studies, and the history of natural history and musicology, this book shifts the terrain upon which all of those fields have comfortably settled. Scholars of sound studies will need to take note of Ochoa’s challenges to European or North American framings."

    “Gautier’s work is tremendously useful. A challenging and rewarding read, I recommend her work to persons who are seriously interested in new approaches to retelling the history of any nation.”

    "Aurality is a significant contribution to the burgeoning field of sound studies. Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier adeptly guides the reader across complex scales of analysis using well-selected historical case studies.... Aurality achieves its goal of establishing a critical vantage point for making sense of the contemporary transformations that are shaping the 21st."

    "Ochoa Gautier provides a vitally important account of the intricate and heterogeneous modes of knowing, being, becoming, and belonging that continue to resonate in the postcolonial lettered city." 

    "[T]he book demonstrates the potentially transformative effect on the way in which we understand the politics of knowledge which can come by starting from speech (or sound) rather than from writing, and from attending to listening as well as to reading."

    "The volume is a must for enthusiasts of sound studies and/or Colombian history. Ochoa Gautier has done a fine job chronicling the way in which the aural played a key role in the definition of a relation between humankind and the body politics of the nation-state. It deserves wide recognition and ample endorsement."

    "The volume is a must for enthusiasts of sound studies and/or Colombian history. Ochoa Gautier does a fine job chronicling the way in which the aural played a key role in the definition of a relation between humankind and the body politics of the nation-state."

    Awards

  • Co-Winner, 2015 Alan Merriam Prize, presented by the Society for Ethnomusicology

  • Reviews

  • "Speaking from the intersection of sound studies, Latin American studies, and the history of natural history and musicology, this book shifts the terrain upon which all of those fields have comfortably settled. Scholars of sound studies will need to take note of Ochoa’s challenges to European or North American framings."

    “Gautier’s work is tremendously useful. A challenging and rewarding read, I recommend her work to persons who are seriously interested in new approaches to retelling the history of any nation.”

    "Aurality is a significant contribution to the burgeoning field of sound studies. Ana Maria Ochoa Gautier adeptly guides the reader across complex scales of analysis using well-selected historical case studies.... Aurality achieves its goal of establishing a critical vantage point for making sense of the contemporary transformations that are shaping the 21st."

    "Ochoa Gautier provides a vitally important account of the intricate and heterogeneous modes of knowing, being, becoming, and belonging that continue to resonate in the postcolonial lettered city." 

    "[T]he book demonstrates the potentially transformative effect on the way in which we understand the politics of knowledge which can come by starting from speech (or sound) rather than from writing, and from attending to listening as well as to reading."

    "The volume is a must for enthusiasts of sound studies and/or Colombian history. Ochoa Gautier has done a fine job chronicling the way in which the aural played a key role in the definition of a relation between humankind and the body politics of the nation-state. It deserves wide recognition and ample endorsement."

    "The volume is a must for enthusiasts of sound studies and/or Colombian history. Ochoa Gautier does a fine job chronicling the way in which the aural played a key role in the definition of a relation between humankind and the body politics of the nation-state."

  • "Aurality shows how hearing, writing, speech, and song were central to the constitution of modern personhood in the nineteenth century. Using Colombia as her grounding point, Ana María Ochoa Gautier explores the ways that colonial intellectuals, creoles, and indigenous people spoke, sung, and wrote across difference as they struggled to establish new kinds of political subjectivity and nationality. Based in deep, creative readings of primary source materials, and steeped in anthropological and cultural theory, Aurality is an erudite, challenging, and rewarding book. It offers a vital alternative to a literature that has too often taken Western Europe and anglophone North America as points of historical departure. Aurality will transform our understandings of the human and the animal; nation and citizenship; music and language; speech and writing; and modernity itself." — Jonathan Sterne, author of, MP3: The Meaning of a Format

    With generous voice and incisive ears, Aurality offers us the gift of listening to and through multiple histories, eavesdropping into a Colombian 19th-century archive in whose seemingly muted vociferations Ana María Ochoa Gautier hears nothing less than the clamor of the political-sensorial genealogy of the Latin American, Caribbean, and global present. Hearing, listening, speaking, writing, and voicing all emerge here as ontological wagers on life, on personhood, and on human - non-human relations. But this is no celebration of the sonorous, it is a most critically sober and theoretically eloquent call that we listen in order to think Latin American (and global) modernity and coloniality again for the first time.
    — Jairo Moreno, author of, Musical Representations, Subjects, and Objects

  • Permission to Photocopy (coursepacks)

    If you are requesting permission to photocopy material for classroom use, please contact the Copyright Clearance Center at copyright.com;

    If the Copyright Clearance Center cannot grant permission, you may request permission from our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Permission to Reprint

    If you are requesting permission to reprint DUP material (journal or book selection) in another book or in any other format, contact our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Images/Art

    Many images/art used in material copyrighted by Duke University Press are controlled, not by the Press, but by the owner of the image. Please check the credit line adjacent to the illustration, as well as the front and back matter of the book for a list of credits. You must obtain permission directly from the owner of the image. Occasionally, Duke University Press controls the rights to maps or other drawings. Please direct permission requests for these images to permissions@dukeupress.edu.
    For book covers to accompany reviews, please contact the publicity department.

    Subsidiary Rights/Foreign Translations

    If you're interested in a Duke University Press book for subsidiary rights/translations, please contact permissions@dukeupress.edu. Include the book title/author, rights sought, and estimated print run.

    Disability Requests

    Instructions for requesting an electronic text on behalf of a student with disabilities are available here.

    Rights & Permissions Contact Information

    Email: permissions@dukeupress.edu
    Email contact for coursepacks: asstpermissions@dukeupress.edu
    Fax: 919-688-4574
    Mail:
    Duke University Press
    Rights and Permissions
    905 W. Main Street
    Suite 18B
    Durham, NC 27701

    For all requests please include:
    1. Author's name. If book has an editor that is different from the article author, include editor's name also.
    2. Title of the journal article or book chapter and title of journal or title of book
    3. Page numbers (if excerpting, provide specifics)
    For coursepacks, please also note: The number of copies requested, the school and professor requesting
    For reprints and subsidiary rights, please also note: Your volume title, publication date, publisher, print run, page count, rights sought
  • Description

    In this audacious book, Ana María Ochoa Gautier explores how listening has been central to the production of notions of language, music, voice, and sound that determine the politics of life. Drawing primarily from nineteenth-century Colombian sources, Ochoa Gautier locates sounds produced by different living entities at the juncture of the human and nonhuman. Her "acoustically tuned" analysis of a wide array of texts reveals multiple debates on the nature of the aural. These discussions were central to a politics of the voice harnessed in the service of the production of different notions of personhood and belonging. In Ochoa Gautier's groundbreaking work, Latin America and the Caribbean emerge as a historical site where the politics of life and the politics of expression inextricably entangle the musical and the linguistic, knowledge and the sensorial.

    About The Author(s)

    Ana María Ochoa Gautier is Associate Professor of Music and Director of the Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University. She is the author of several books in Spanish.
Explore More
Share

Create a reading list or add to an existing list. Sign-in or register now to continue.


Contact Us

  • Duke University Press
  • 905 W. Main St. Ste 18-B
  • Durham, NC 27701
  • U.S. phone (toll-free): 888-651-0122
  • International: 1-919-688-5134
  • orders@dukeupress.edu