• Preface / Critical Ethnic Studies Editorial Collective  ix

    Introduction: A Sightline / Critical Ethnic Studies Editorial Collective  1

    I. The Multicultural Nation and the Violence of Liberal Rights  17

    1. "As Though It Were Our Own": Against a Politics of Identification / Shana L. Redmond  19

    2. Juan Crow: Progressive Mutations of the Black-White Binary / John D. Marquez  43

    3. Can the Line Move? Antiblackness and a Diasporic Logic of Forced Social Epidermalizaton / João H. Costa Vargas  63

    4. (Re)producing the Nation: Treaty Rights, Gay Marriage, and the Settler State / Lindsey Schneider  92

    5. Hateful Travels: Queering Ethnic Studies in a Context of Criminalization, Pathologization, and Globalization / Jin Haritaworn  106

    6. Critical Contradictions: A Conversion among Glen Coulthard, Dylan Rodríguez, and Sarita Echavez See / Moderated by Sarita Echavez See  138

    II. Critical Ethnic Studies Projects Meet the Neoliberal University  159

    7. A Better Life? Asian Americans and the Necropolitics of Higher Education / Long T. Bui  161

    8. Notes from a Member of the Demographic Threat: This Is What "We Are All Palestinians" Really Means / Nada Elia  175

    9. Restructuring, Resistance, and Knowledge Production on Campus: The Story of the Department of Equity Studies at York University / Tania Das Gupta  190

    10. "The Goal of the Revolution Is the Elimination of Anxiety": On the Right to Abundance in a Time of Artificial Scarcity / David Lloyd  203

    11. Subjucated Knowledges: Activism, Scholarship, and Ethnic Studies Ways of Knowing / Dan Berger  215

    III. The Body and the Dispensations of Racial Capital  229

    12. Becoming Disabled / Becoming Black: Crippin' Critical Ethnic Studies from the Periphery / Nirmala Erevelles  231

    13. Arts and Crafts, Elsewhere and Home, Mama & Me: Defying Transnormativity through Bobby Cheung's Creative Modalities of Resignification / Bo Leungsuraswat  252

    14. Indra Sinha's Melancholic Citizenship: Marking the Violence of Uneven Development in Animal's People / Andrew uzendoski  269

    15. Cocoa Chandelier's Confessional: Kanaka Maoli Performance and Aloha in Drag / Stephanie Nohelani Teves  281

    IV. Militarism, Empire, and War: The Security State and States of Insecurity  201

    16. Surrogates and Subcontractors: Flexibility and Obscurity in U.S. Immigrant Detention / David M. Hernández  303

    17. Of "Mates" and Men: The Comparative Racial Politics of Filipino Naval Enlistment, circa 1941-1943 / Jason Luna Gavilan  326

    18. The Thickening Borderlands: Bastard Mestiz@s, "Illegal" Possibilities, and Globalizing Migrant Life / Gilberto Rosas  344

    19. Up in the Air and on the Skin: Drone Warfare and the Queer Calculus of Pain / Ronak K. Kapadai  360

    20. Empire's Verticality: The Af-Pak Frontier, Visual Culture, and Racialization from Above / Keith P. Feldman  376

    V. Fugitive Socialities and Alternative Futures

    21. Decolonization, "Race," and Remaindered Life under Empire / Neferti X. M. Tadiar  395

    22. Critical Ethnic Studies, Identity Politics, and the Right-Left Convergence / Ella Shohat and Robert Stam  416

    23. Césaire's Gift and the Decolonial Turn / Nelson Maldonado-Torres / 435

    24. Checkered Choices, Political Associations: The Unarticulated Racial Identity of La 24. Asociación Nacional México-Americana / Laura Pulido  463

    25. Racializing Biopolitics and Bare Life / Alexander G. Weheliye  477

    Bibliography  495

    Contributors  535

    Index


  • Dan Berger

    Long Bui

    Glen Coulthard

    Tania Das Gupta

    Nirmala Erevelles

    Keith P. Feldman

    Jason Gavilan

    Alyosha Goldstein

    Jin Haritaworn

    Ronak Kapadia

    David Lloyd

    Bo Luengsuraswat

    Nelson Maldonado-Torres

    John Marquez

    Laura Pulido

    Gilberto Rosas

    Lindsey Schneider

    Ella Shohat

    Robert Stam

    Neferti X. M. Tadiar

    Lani Teves

    Andrew Uzendoski

    João H. Costa Vargas

    Alexander G. Weheliye

  • "This ambitious new collection from the Critical Ethnic Studies Association successfully stakes out important intellectual and political stances in the field of ethnic studies."

    "The critical engagement in this collection makes it a tour de force on/of Critical Ethnic Studies. Indeed, this edited collection has been long awaited. The book’s analytics of Critical Ethnic Studies demonstrates the breath of the discipline’s epistemological, methodological and political engagements and carves out a necessarily transdisciplinary space for this area of study within academia in our putatively ‘post-race’ and ‘post-feminist’ times."

    Reviews

  • "This ambitious new collection from the Critical Ethnic Studies Association successfully stakes out important intellectual and political stances in the field of ethnic studies."

    "The critical engagement in this collection makes it a tour de force on/of Critical Ethnic Studies. Indeed, this edited collection has been long awaited. The book’s analytics of Critical Ethnic Studies demonstrates the breath of the discipline’s epistemological, methodological and political engagements and carves out a necessarily transdisciplinary space for this area of study within academia in our putatively ‘post-race’ and ‘post-feminist’ times."

  • "This ambitious and significant volume signals a major realignment in the theorization and study of race and ethnicity in the United States and its wide ranging imperial formations. A major contribution to the interdisciplinary analysis of intersectional formations of race and ethnicity, it will no doubt be a widely read and influential touchstone for Critical Ethnic Studies." — Alyosha Goldstein, editor of, Formations of United States Colonialism

    "Critical Ethnic Studies: A Reader brings together some of the best established and rising scholars to provide an ambitious, rigorous, and timely account of the ongoing violences of settler colonialism, racialization, and exploitation in the midst of neoliberal appropriation and affirmation. At once an invaluable teaching resource and a comprehensive re-mapping of the avenues of inquiry in the field, this momentous work confirms the urgency and importance of Ethnic Studies scholarship for a changing world."  — Grace Kyungwon Hong, author of, Death beyond Disavowal: The Impossible Politics of Difference

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  • Description

    Building on the intellectual and political momentum that established the Critical Ethnic Studies Association, this Reader inaugurates a radical response to the appropriations of liberal multiculturalism while building on the possibilities enlivened by the historical work of Ethnic Studies. It does not attempt to circumscribe the boundaries of Critical Ethnic Studies; rather, it offers a space to promote open dialogue, discussion, and debate regarding the field's expansive, politically complex, and intellectually rich concerns. Covering a wide range of topics, from multiculturalism, the neoliberal university, and the exploitation of bodies to empire, the militarized security state, and decolonialism, these twenty-five essays call attention to the urgency of articulating a Critical Ethnic Studies for the twenty-first century. 
     
     

    About The Author(s)

    The members of the Critical Ethnic Studies Editorial Collective are Nada Elia, Independent Scholar; David M. Hernández, Assistant Professor of Latina/o Studies at Mount Holyoke College; Jodi Kim, Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Riverside; Shana L. Redmond, Associate Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California; Dylan Rodríguez, Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Riverside; and Sarita Echavez See, Associate Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of California, Riverside.
     
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