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  • Foreword  xi

    Preface. Ending This Book without Nazario Turpo  xv

    Story 1. Agreeing to Remember, Translating, and Carefully Co-laboring  1

    Interlude 1. Mariano Turpo: A Leader In-Ayllu 35

    Story 2. Mariano Engages "the Land Struggle": An Unthinkable Indian Leader  59

    Story 3. Mariano's Cosmopolitics: Between Lawyers and Ausangate  91

    Story 4. Mariano's Archive: The Eventfulness of the Ahistorical  117

    Interlude 2. Nazario Turpo: "The Altomisayuq Who Went to Heaven"  153

    Story 5. Chamanismo Andino in the Third Millennium: Multiculturalism Meets Earth-Beings  179

    Story 6. A Comedy of Equivocations: Nazario Turpo's Collaboration with the National Musuem of the American Indian  209

    Story 7. Munayniyuq: The Owner of the Will (and How to Control That Will)  243

    Epilogue. Ethnographic Cosmopolitics  273

    Acknowledgments  287

    Notes  291

    References  303

    Index  317
  • Daniel R. Reichman

    Robert J. Foster

  • "While theoretically sophisticated, the book’s concrete language and brief introductory asides make it suitable for advanced undergraduates unfamiliar with its core concepts." 

    "This book forces us to rethink the world as we know it, and the tools that we deploy to know it. In contrast to the dominant ontology informed by a nature-culture divide, the stories and struggles of Mariano and Nazario oblige us to defamiliarize ourselves from this divide and consider how we experience ourselves in the world and how the world experiences us along with the ethical and political implications of these interdependences."

    "Earth Beings is essential reading for those following current research on relational ontologies and the importance of other-than-human contributions to society (ayllu) by encouraging us to think about how beings, places, knowledges, and power interact, particularly in the Peruvian Andes, but in a way that is relevant to much of South America and beyond.... [T]he exceptional ethnographic narratives and the clarity of writing make this a monograph that could be incorporated into a senior undergraduate or, more likely, a graduate level anthropology, geography, environmental studies, political sciences, or Indigenous studies class."

    "De la Cadena's Earth Beings reads, from start to finish, as a labor of love. . . . Each page is dense with insights about the intricacies and challenges of collaborative politics."

    "De la Cadena’s book is an important read and a profound application of contemporary theory to Quechua struggles in South America. It is a moving yet challenging read where the discussions, specifically on cultural politics and representation, can be applied in numerous Indigenous contexts to better transform the relational mode of interactions and divisions between nature, humans and other- than- human entities within a political realm."

    "This remarkable work offers vital evidence toward the subaltern studies project of critically re-thinking the written history of subordinate peoples."

    "Earth Beings is a powerful ethnography, the result of more than a decade of fieldwork in the Peruvian Andes.... [T]he reader can visualize the changes in the political opportunities for indigenous peoples in Peru’s political trajectory from liberalism to socialism to, most recently, the neoliberal multiculturalism of the new millennium."

    Reviews

  • "While theoretically sophisticated, the book’s concrete language and brief introductory asides make it suitable for advanced undergraduates unfamiliar with its core concepts." 

    "This book forces us to rethink the world as we know it, and the tools that we deploy to know it. In contrast to the dominant ontology informed by a nature-culture divide, the stories and struggles of Mariano and Nazario oblige us to defamiliarize ourselves from this divide and consider how we experience ourselves in the world and how the world experiences us along with the ethical and political implications of these interdependences."

    "Earth Beings is essential reading for those following current research on relational ontologies and the importance of other-than-human contributions to society (ayllu) by encouraging us to think about how beings, places, knowledges, and power interact, particularly in the Peruvian Andes, but in a way that is relevant to much of South America and beyond.... [T]he exceptional ethnographic narratives and the clarity of writing make this a monograph that could be incorporated into a senior undergraduate or, more likely, a graduate level anthropology, geography, environmental studies, political sciences, or Indigenous studies class."

    "De la Cadena's Earth Beings reads, from start to finish, as a labor of love. . . . Each page is dense with insights about the intricacies and challenges of collaborative politics."

    "De la Cadena’s book is an important read and a profound application of contemporary theory to Quechua struggles in South America. It is a moving yet challenging read where the discussions, specifically on cultural politics and representation, can be applied in numerous Indigenous contexts to better transform the relational mode of interactions and divisions between nature, humans and other- than- human entities within a political realm."

    "This remarkable work offers vital evidence toward the subaltern studies project of critically re-thinking the written history of subordinate peoples."

    "Earth Beings is a powerful ethnography, the result of more than a decade of fieldwork in the Peruvian Andes.... [T]he reader can visualize the changes in the political opportunities for indigenous peoples in Peru’s political trajectory from liberalism to socialism to, most recently, the neoliberal multiculturalism of the new millennium."

  • "In response to its own subject, this is an extraordinary intervention in ethnography. Marisol de la Cadena writes not across genres—different perspectives on one entity—but in a way that allows different entities to emerge, and they're not 'genres' at all. Diverse narratives, conversations, and recollections can be read simultaneously as scholarly tools and as making present realities they can hardly contain. A highly courageous and, in personal terms, deeply moving book."  — Marilyn Strathern, Cambridge University

    "Earth Beings is one of those books that emerge into the scholarly domain once in a decade that crystallizes that decade's debates and rearticulates them in ways that open paths into new worlds." — Arturo Escobar, author of Territories of Difference: Place, Movements, Life, Redes

    "It matters which stories tell stories. A leader in rethinking the partial connections and excessive entanglements of state and indigenous worlds in the Andes and beyond, Marisol de la Cadena writes stories that make this simple aphorism lively indeed. It matters which stories normalize other stories and which build the power in recursive retellings and reworkings to gnaw at the established order of things in vexed worlds. Especially when material stories are also told by earth others, exacting their reciprocal consequences on both state and indigenous human actors, what is at stake is not cultural diversity or epistemological relativism, but something much closer to worlding, to composing and decomposing some worlds and not others with unexpected partners. Earth Beings helps me rethink these matters through the churning of a mountain."  — Donna J. Haraway, author of When Species Meet

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  • Description

    Earth Beings is the fruit of Marisol de la Cadena's decade-long conversations with Mariano and Nazario Turpo, father and son, runakuna or Quechua people. Concerned with the mutual entanglements of indigenous and nonindigenous worlds, and the partial connections between them, de la Cadena presents how the Turpos' indigenous ways of knowing and being include and exceed modern and nonmodern practices. Her discussion of indigenous political strategies—a realm that need not abide by binary logics—reconfigures how to think about and question modern politics, while pushing her readers to think beyond "hybridity" and toward translation, communication that accepts incommensurability, and mutual difference as conditions for ethnography to work.
     

    About The Author(s)

    Marisol de la Cadena is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Davis, and the author of Indigenous Mestizos: The Politics of Race and Culture in Cuzco, Peru, 1919–1991, also published by Duke University Press.
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