• Acknowledgments ix

    Introduction. Re-membering Gay Latino Studies / Michael Hames García and Ernesto J. Martínez 1

    Queer Theory Revisited / Michael Hames García 19

    Comment. It's All in Having a History / María Lugones 46

    Gay Shame, Latina- and Latino-Style: A Critique of White Queer Performativity / Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes 55

    Comment / Ramón García 81

    The Place of Gay Male Chicano Literature in Queer Chicana/o Work / Antonio Viego 86

    Comment. Our Queer Kin / Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquibel 105

    Carnal Knowledge: Chicano Gay Men and the Dialectics of Being / Richard T. Rodríguez 113

    Comment. Entre Machos y Maricones: (Re)Covering Chicano Gay Male (Hi)Stories / Daniel Enrique Pérez 141

    Entre Hombres/Between Men: Latino Masculinities and Homosexualities / Lionel Cantú 147

    Comment. The Material and Cultural Worlds of Latino Gay Men / Tomás Almaguer 168

    Gay Latino Cultural Citizenship: Predicaments of Identity and Visibility in San Francisco in the 1990s / Horacio N. Roque Ramírez 175

    Comment / Ramón A. Gutiérrez 198

    Feeling Brown: Ethnicity and Affect in Ricardo Bracho's The Sweetest Hangover (and Other STDs) / José Esteban Muñoz 204

    Comment. Never Too Much: Queer Performance between Impossibility and Excess / Ricardo L. Ortíz 220

    Shifting the Site of Queer Enunciation: Manuel Muñoz and the Politics of Form / Ernesto J. Martínez 226

    Comment. Dancing with the Devil—When the Devil is Gay / Paula M. L. Moya 250

    Choreographies of Resistance: Latino Queer Dance and the Utopian Performative / Ramón H. Rivera-Servera 259

    Comment / Daniel Contreras 281

    Dance Liberation / David Román 286

    Comment. Dance with Me / Frances Negrón-Muntaner 311

    Bibliography 321

    Contributors 349

    Index 353
  • Michael Hames-García

    María Lugones

    Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes

    Ramon Garcia

    Antonio Viego

    Luz Calvo

    Richard T. Rodríguez

    Daniel Enrique Perez

    Lionel Cantú

    Tomás Almaguer

    Horacio N. Roque Ramírez

    Ramón Gutiérrez

    José Esteban Muñoz

    Ricardo L. Ortiz

    Paula M. L. Moya

    Ramón H. Rivera-Servera

    Daniel Teodoro Contreras

    David Román

    Frances Negron-Muntaner

    Ernesto Javier Martínez

    Catriona Rueda Esquibel

  • Winner, 2012 Lambda Literary Awards, LGBT Anthology category

  • Gay Latino Studies: A Critical Reader is a collection of essays that's a literate chinga tu madre to the heteronormativity that's still endemic in Mexican (and Latino) society. Remember, gentle raza readers: We can't be homophobes and whine about Mexi discrimination in the same breath. Help eradicate H8 by buying this libro.”

    Gay Latino Studies is an important reader that will be useful to students and scholars in a range of disciplines, including American, Chicano, Latino, and ethnic studies; queer, feminist, and gender studies; and performance studies, English, and sociology. . . . Gay Latino Studies: A Critical Reader will be a valuable reference work for any university or personal library, for readers familiar with the themes and debates in gay Latino and Chicano studies, and for readers who are just entering these vital conversations.”

    “I breathe a sigh of relief with the publication of Gay Latino Studies: A Critical Reader. Even before it existed, it was missing. . . . The chapters are speaking to each other, having conversations. This format invites readers to listen and chime in. . . . And that’s what’s so cool about Gay Latino Studies for me. It feels familiar, like I know these brothers, and I do. Like I’m in those pages here and there, and I am.”

    "Gay Latino Studies is a provocative volume. It stimulates readers to take a critical look at the debates and studies surrounding sexuality. The introduction ("Remembering Gay Latino Studies") as well as the following ten articles included in the book--with their respective commentary--allow us to find at least two major lane markers in the shifting sands of the areas of sexuality, race and gender studies. On the one had they challenge us to recognize the unfinished character of our analytical tools and methodology as well as the complexities of research and of the social and political actors that give new meaning to academic endeavors. They invite us as well to reflect upon the context of academic production. How is it produced? What is produced? From where does it speak? Who is speaking?" (Translated from the Spanish)

    "I’ve been waiting for a book like this – as personal and intellectually stimulating as this one – for over a decade. A book that uses, and yet does not take for granted, the very categories that inspire its existence. This inspiring compilation of chapters (some of which have been published in the previous decade) followed by recent critiques effectively offers a critical studies reader that moves between the categories, gay and queer, in complex ways. This, for some of us, is inevitably our bible."

    Awards

  • Winner, 2012 Lambda Literary Awards, LGBT Anthology category

  • Reviews

  • Gay Latino Studies: A Critical Reader is a collection of essays that's a literate chinga tu madre to the heteronormativity that's still endemic in Mexican (and Latino) society. Remember, gentle raza readers: We can't be homophobes and whine about Mexi discrimination in the same breath. Help eradicate H8 by buying this libro.”

    Gay Latino Studies is an important reader that will be useful to students and scholars in a range of disciplines, including American, Chicano, Latino, and ethnic studies; queer, feminist, and gender studies; and performance studies, English, and sociology. . . . Gay Latino Studies: A Critical Reader will be a valuable reference work for any university or personal library, for readers familiar with the themes and debates in gay Latino and Chicano studies, and for readers who are just entering these vital conversations.”

    “I breathe a sigh of relief with the publication of Gay Latino Studies: A Critical Reader. Even before it existed, it was missing. . . . The chapters are speaking to each other, having conversations. This format invites readers to listen and chime in. . . . And that’s what’s so cool about Gay Latino Studies for me. It feels familiar, like I know these brothers, and I do. Like I’m in those pages here and there, and I am.”

    "Gay Latino Studies is a provocative volume. It stimulates readers to take a critical look at the debates and studies surrounding sexuality. The introduction ("Remembering Gay Latino Studies") as well as the following ten articles included in the book--with their respective commentary--allow us to find at least two major lane markers in the shifting sands of the areas of sexuality, race and gender studies. On the one had they challenge us to recognize the unfinished character of our analytical tools and methodology as well as the complexities of research and of the social and political actors that give new meaning to academic endeavors. They invite us as well to reflect upon the context of academic production. How is it produced? What is produced? From where does it speak? Who is speaking?" (Translated from the Spanish)

    "I’ve been waiting for a book like this – as personal and intellectually stimulating as this one – for over a decade. A book that uses, and yet does not take for granted, the very categories that inspire its existence. This inspiring compilation of chapters (some of which have been published in the previous decade) followed by recent critiques effectively offers a critical studies reader that moves between the categories, gay and queer, in complex ways. This, for some of us, is inevitably our bible."

  • Gay Latino Studies is a startlingly original collection of essays on the culture and social worlds of gay Latinos. Using a wonderful format that pairs essays with response pieces, the book as a whole reads like a sparkling conversation full of wit, insight, cultural relevance, and political critique. Covering topics from gay shame and shamelessness, to dance and sexual identity, to the impact of HIV on gay Latino communities, Gay Latino Studies will quickly find its way onto bookshelves and into classrooms around the world.” — Judith Halberstam, author of, Female Masculinity

    “This collection will be an indispensable reference for any scholar working in queer or Latina/o studies. With its broad disciplinary and theoretical scope, it effectively establishes the field of gay Latino studies. It will shape the questions posed in this realm of study for some time to come.” — Ramón Saldívar, author of, The Borderlands of Culture: Américo Paredes and the Transnational Imaginary

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  • Description

    The authors of the essays in this unique collection explore the lives and cultural contributions of gay Latino men in the United States, while also analyzing the political and theoretical stakes of gay Latino studies. In new essays and influential previously published pieces, Latino scholars based in American studies, ethnic studies, history, performance studies, and sociology consider gay Latino scholarly and cultural work in relation to mainstream gay, lesbian, and queer academic discourses and the broader field of Chicano and Latino studies. They also critique cultural explanations of gay Latino sexual identity and behavior, examine artistic representations of queer Latinidad, and celebrate the place of dance in gay Latino culture. Designed to stimulate dialogue, the collection pairs each essay with a critical response by a prominent Latino/a or Chicana/o scholar. Terms such as gay, identity, queer, and visibility are contested throughout the volume; the significance of these debates is often brought to the fore in the commentaries. The essays in Gay Latino Studies complement and overlap with the groundbreaking work of lesbians of color and critical race theorists, as well as queer theorists and gay and lesbian studies scholars. Taken together, they offer much-needed insight into the lives and perspectives of gay, bisexual, and queer Latinos, and they renew attention to the politics of identity and coalition.

    Contributors. Tomás Almaguer, Luz Calvo, Lionel Cantú,, Daniel Contreras, Catriona Rueda Esquibel, Ramón García, Ramón A. Gutiérrez, Michael Hames-García, Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes, María Lugones, Ernesto J. Martínez, Paula M. L. Moya, José Esteban Muñoz, Frances Negrón-Muntaner, Ricardo L. Ortiz, Daniel Enrique Pérez, Ramón H. Rivera-Servera, Richard T. Rodríguez, David Román, Horacio N. Roque Ramírez, Antonio Viego

    About The Author(s)

    Michael Hames-García is Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon.

    Ernesto Javier Martínez is Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and of Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon.

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