Home Rule

National Sovereignty and the Separation of Natives and Migrants

Home Rule

Book Pages: 384 Illustrations: Published: February 2020

Author: Nandita Sharma

Subjects
Globalization and Neoliberalism, Postcolonial and Colonial Studies, Sociology > Social Theory

In Home Rule Nandita Sharma traces the historical formation and political separation of Natives and Migrants from the nineteenth century to the present to theorize the portrayal of Migrants as “colonial invaders.” The imperial-state category of Native, initially a mark of colonized status, has been revitalized in what Sharma terms the Postcolonial New World Order of nation-states. Under postcolonial rule, claims to autochthony—being the Native “people of a place”—are mobilized to define true national belonging. Consequently, Migrants—the quintessential “people out of place”—increasingly face exclusion, expulsion, or even extermination. This turn to autochthony has led to a hardening of nationalism(s). Criteria for political membership have shrunk, immigration controls have intensified, all while practices of expropriation and exploitation have expanded. Such politics exemplify the postcolonial politics of national sovereignty, a politics that Sharma sees as containing our dreams of decolonization. Home Rule rejects nationalisms and calls for the dissolution of the ruling categories of Native and Migrant so we can build a common, worldly place where our fundamental liberty to stay and move is realized.

Praise

“Nandita Sharma has taken on the most burning issues of our times and written about them with clarity, grace, and power. She shows us a path from an oppressive past to a radical, humane future based on a ‘mobile politics of solidarity.’ This brilliant, timely book is a must-read for scholars and activists alike.” — Marcus Rediker, University of Pittsburgh

Home Rule is a bold, ambitious book that advances an original, complex, and controversial argument about the social and political production of binary oppositions and antagonisms between indigenous ‘Natives’ and ‘Migrants’. Bristling with important and exciting ideas, it challenges us to interrogate some of the most pernicious complacencies of contemporary political discourse, providing an innovative, wide-ranging examination of the global politics of autochthony and a far-reaching reconsideration of the postcolonial world order.” — Nicholas De Genova, editor of The Borders of “Europe”: Autonomy of Migration, Tactics of Bordering

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Open Access

Author/Editor Bios Back to Top

Nandita Sharma is Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa and author of Home Economics: Nationalism and the Making of ‘"Migrant Workers" in Canada.

Table of Contents Back to Top
Acknowledgments  ix
1. Home Rule: The National Politics of Separation  1
2. The Imperial Government of Mobility and Stasis  36
3. The National Government of Mobility and Stasis  62
4. The Jealousy of Nations: Globalizing National Constraints on Human Mobility  90
5. The Postcolonial New World Order and the Containment of Decolonization  117
6. Developing the Postcolonial New World Order  142
7. Global Lockdown: Postcolonial Expansion of National Citizenship and Immigration Controls  163
8. National Autochthonies and the Making of Postcolonial National-Natives  205
9. Postseparation: Struggles for a Decolonized Commons  268
Notes  285
Bibliography  299
Index
Sales/Territorial Rights: World

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Additional InformationBack to Top
Paper ISBN: 978-1-4780-0095-2 / Cloth ISBN: 978-1-4780-0077-8
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