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    978-1-4780-0180-5
  • Table of Contents Forthcoming
  • Inna Arzumanova

    Aymar Jean Christian

    Kevin Fellezs

    Roderick A. Ferguson

    Eva Hageman

    Daniel Martinez HoSang

    Victoria E. Johnson

    Joseph Lowndes

    Safiya Umoja Noble

    Radhika Parameswaran

    Sarah T. Roberts

    Brandi Thompson Summers

    Karen Tongson

    Cynthia A. Young

    Catherine Squires

  • “In this well-written, wide-ranging collection, imaginative and innovative researchers from across the disciplines conduct a post-mortem of the illusion of postracialism. Through case studies of the role race plays in diverse areas of contemporary culture, Racism Postrace takes stock of the continuing allure of the post-racial despite its implausibility, but also of the ways in which its demise can point the way toward better and more effective imaginings of social justice.” — George Lipsitz, author of, The Possessive Investment in Whiteness

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  • Description

    With the election of Barack Obama, the idea that American society had become postracial—that is, race was no longer a main factor in influencing and structuring people's lives—took hold in public consciousness, increasingly accepted by many. The contributors to Racism Postrace examine the concept of postrace and its powerful history and allure, showing how proclamations of a postracial society further normalize racism and obscure structural antiblackness. They trace expressions of postrace over and through a wide variety of cultural texts, events, and people, from sports (LeBron James's move to Miami), music (Pharrell Williams's “Happy”), and television (The Voice and HGTV) to public policy debates, academic disputes, and technology industries. Outlining how postrace ideologies confound struggles for racial justice and equality, the contributors open up new critical avenues for understanding the powerful cultural, discursive, and material conditions that render postrace the racial project of our time.

    Contributors. Inna Arzumanova, Sarah Banet-Weiser, Aymer Jean Christian, Kevin Fellezs, Roderick A. Ferguson, Herman Gray, Eva C. Hageman, Daniel Martinez HoSang, Victoria E. Johnson, Joseph Lowndes, Roopali Mukherjee, Safiya Umoja Noble, Radhika Parameswaran, Sarah T. Roberts, Catherine R. Squires, Brandi Thompson Summers, Karen Tongson, Cynthia A. Young

    About The Author(s)

    Roopali Mukherjee is Associate Professor of Media Studies at City University of New York, Queens College.

    Sarah Banet-Weiser is Professor of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics.

    Herman Gray is Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Cruz.
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