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    978-0-8223-1478-3
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    978-0-8223-1493-6
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  • Preface vii

    New Americanists: Revisionist Interventions in to the Canon / Donald E. Pease 1

    The Res Publica of Letters / Michael Warner 38

    The Rationale for "The American Romance" / John McWilliams 71

    Scarcity, Subjectivity, and Emerson / Wai-chee Dimock 83

    Hearing Narrative Voices in Melville's Pierre / Priscilla Wald 100

    The Rhetorical Use and Abuse of Fiction: Eating Books in Late Nineteenth-Century American / Steven Mailloux 133

    Maternal Discourse and the Romance of Self-Possession in Kate Chopin's The Awakening / Ivy Schweitzer 158

    Realism, Ideology, and the Novel in American (1886-1896): Changing Perspectives in the Work of Mark Twain, W. D. Howells, and Henry James / Robert Weimann 189

    American Literature and the New Historicism: The Example of Frederick Douglass / Gregory S. Jay 211

    "Ours by the Law of Naure": Romance and Independents on Mark Twain's River / Howard Horwitz 243

    Cataloging the Creatures of the Deep: "Billy Budd, Sailor" and the Rise of Sociology / Susan Misruchi 272

    Violence, Revolution and the Cost of Freedom: John Brown and W. E. B. DuBois / WIlliam E. Cain 305

    Contributors 331

    Index 333
  • Donald E. Pease

    Michael Warner

    John McWilliams

    Wai Chee Dimock

    Priscilla Wald

    Steven Mailloux

    Ivy Schweitzer

    Robert Weimann

    Gregory Jay

    Susan Mizruchi

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  • Description

    Throughout the era of the Cold War a consensus reigned as to what constituted the great works of American literature. Yet as scholars have increasingly shown, and as this volume unmistakably demonstrates, that consensus was built upon the repression of the voices and historical contexts of subordinated social groups as well as literary works themselves, works both outside and within the traditional canon. This book is an effort to recover those lost voices. Engaging New Historicist, neo-Marxist, poststructuralist, and other literary practices, this volume marks important shifts in the organizing principles and self-understanding of the field of American Studies.
    Originally published as a special issue of boundary 2, the essays gathered here discuss writers as diverse as Kate Chopin, Frederick Douglass, Emerson, Melville, W. D. Howells, Henry James, W. E. B. DuBois, and Mark Twain, plus the historical figure John Brown. Two major sections devoted to the theory of romance and to cultural-historical analyses emphasize the political perspective of "New Americanist" literary and cultural study.

    Contributors. William E. Cain, Wai-chee Dimock, Howard Horwitz, Gregory S. Jay, Steven Mailloux, John McWilliams, Susan Mizruchi, Donald E. Pease, Ivy Schweitzer, Priscilla Wald, Michael Warner, Robert Weimann

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