• The Brain′s Body: Neuroscience and Corporeal Politics

    Author(s):
    Pages: 192
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
  • Cloth: $79.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-6107-7
  • Paperback: $22.95 - In Stock
    978-0-8223-6126-8
  • Quantity
  • Add To Bag
  • Acknowledgments  ix

    Introduction: The Social Brain and Corporeal Politics  1

    1. The Phenomenon of Brain Plasticity  17

    2. What Difference Does the Body Make?  43

    3. I Feel Your Pain  67

    4. Neurobiology and the Queerness of Kinship  95

    Conclusion: The Multiplicity of Embodiment  119

    Notes  129

    References  153

    Index  177
  • Winner, 2016 PSA Women's Caucus Prize in Feminist Philosophy of Science

  • "The Brain’s Body’s relevance and importance lie not only in this re-positioning of affect in neuroscience, but also in that... it deeply challenges the very presuppositions of the science itself, and how they function, in a burgeoning discipline that codifies our bodies and mind more intricately than ever before."

    "[R]ather than embrace research on brain plasticity as telling an agreeable tale of human freedom, flexibility, and adaptability, Pitts-Taylor considers findings that clearly matter—the effects of childhood poverty on the neurological development of language systems—and shows just how entangled this research is with imaginings of social 'others.'"

    "This is an important book. . . . Pitts-Taylor’s focus on the corporeal politics of multiplicity should contribute to a range of areas in medical sociology."

    "The Brain’s Body is one of those books so incredibly useful for the work it does to help us understand and describe where it is we are—at a historical juncture where the stakes of feminist scientific literacy and engagement are high."

    Awards

  • Winner, 2016 PSA Women's Caucus Prize in Feminist Philosophy of Science

  • Reviews

  • "The Brain’s Body’s relevance and importance lie not only in this re-positioning of affect in neuroscience, but also in that... it deeply challenges the very presuppositions of the science itself, and how they function, in a burgeoning discipline that codifies our bodies and mind more intricately than ever before."

    "[R]ather than embrace research on brain plasticity as telling an agreeable tale of human freedom, flexibility, and adaptability, Pitts-Taylor considers findings that clearly matter—the effects of childhood poverty on the neurological development of language systems—and shows just how entangled this research is with imaginings of social 'others.'"

    "This is an important book. . . . Pitts-Taylor’s focus on the corporeal politics of multiplicity should contribute to a range of areas in medical sociology."

    "The Brain’s Body is one of those books so incredibly useful for the work it does to help us understand and describe where it is we are—at a historical juncture where the stakes of feminist scientific literacy and engagement are high."

  • "An exciting book, The Brain's Body adds wonderful new dimensions to the fruitful but still limited conversation between neuroscience and feminism while introducing readers to new literatures, novel interpretations, and exciting interweavings of arguments on key debates about neuroscience from a variety of fields. In generous and creative ways, Victoria Pitts-Taylor mines contemporary neuroscience for its nonreductionist potential, pointing out some of its clear resonances with feminist epistemologies. No one else has yet tackled in such depth the ways that emerging research regarding brain plasticity provide a strong empirical bridge between 'mainstream' science and feminist theory."  — Rebecca M. Jordan-Young, author of Brain Storm: The Flaws in the Science of Sex Differences

    "The Brain’s Body brings clarity and sociological finesse to current debates about the role of neuroscientific data in public and intellectual life. With remarkable fluency, this book places the embodied specifics of race, class, disability, gender, and sexuality at the center of our responses to the brain sciences. This will be an indispensable and widely read guide for how to work with neurological data in the social sciences."  — Elizabeth A. Wilson, author of Gut Feminism

  • Permission to Photocopy (coursepacks)

    If you are requesting permission to photocopy material for classroom use, please contact the Copyright Clearance Center at copyright.com;

    If the Copyright Clearance Center cannot grant permission, you may request permission from our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Permission to Reprint

    If you are requesting permission to reprint DUP material (journal or book selection) in another book or in any other format, contact our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Images/Art

    Many images/art used in material copyrighted by Duke University Press are controlled, not by the Press, but by the owner of the image. Please check the credit line adjacent to the illustration, as well as the front and back matter of the book for a list of credits. You must obtain permission directly from the owner of the image. Occasionally, Duke University Press controls the rights to maps or other drawings. Please direct permission requests for these images to permissions@dukeupress.edu.
    For book covers to accompany reviews, please contact the publicity department.

    Subsidiary Rights/Foreign Translations

    If you're interested in a Duke University Press book for subsidiary rights/translations, please contact permissions@dukeupress.edu. Include the book title/author, rights sought, and estimated print run.

    Disability Requests

    Instructions for requesting an electronic text on behalf of a student with disabilities are available here.

    Rights & Permissions Contact Information

    Email: permissions@dukeupress.edu
    Email contact for coursepacks: asstpermissions@dukeupress.edu
    Fax: 919-688-4574
    Mail:
    Duke University Press
    Rights and Permissions
    905 W. Main Street
    Suite 18B
    Durham, NC 27701

    For all requests please include:
    1. Author's name. If book has an editor that is different from the article author, include editor's name also.
    2. Title of the journal article or book chapter and title of journal or title of book
    3. Page numbers (if excerpting, provide specifics)
    For coursepacks, please also note: The number of copies requested, the school and professor requesting
    For reprints and subsidiary rights, please also note: Your volume title, publication date, publisher, print run, page count, rights sought
  • Description

    In The Brain's Body Victoria Pitts-Taylor brings feminist and critical theory to bear on new development in neuroscience to demonstrate how power and inequality are materially and symbolically entangled with neurobiological bodies. Pitts-Taylor is interested in how the brain interacts with and is impacted by social structures, especially in regard to race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability, as well as how those social structures shape neuroscientific knowledge. Pointing out that some brain scientists have not fully abandoned reductionist or determinist explanations of neurobiology, Pitts-Taylor moves beyond debates over nature and nurture to address the politics of plastic, biosocial brains. She highlights the potential of research into poverty's effects on the brain to reinforce certain notions of poor subjects and to justify particular forms of governance, while her queer critique of kinship research demonstrates the limitations of hypotheses based on heteronormative assumptions. In her exploration of the embodied mind and the "embrained" body, Pitts-Taylor highlights the inextricability of nature and culture and shows why using feminist and queer thought is essential to understanding the biosociality of the brain. 
     

    About The Author(s)

    Victoria Pitts-Taylor is Professor of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Wesleyan University and the author of Surgery Junkies: Wellness and Pathology in Cosmetic Culture.
     

Explore More
Share

Create a reading list or add to an existing list. Sign-in or register now to continue.


Contact Us

  • Duke University Press
  • 905 W. Main St. Ste 18-B
  • Durham, NC 27701
  • U.S. phone (toll-free): 888-651-0122
  • International: 1-919-688-5134
  • orders@dukeupress.edu