• Paperback: $45.00 - In Stock
    978-0-938989-33-2
  • Quantity
  • Add To Bag
  • Foreword / Kimerly Rorschach 9

    Curator's Acknowledgments / Trevor Schoonmaker 11

    The Record: Contemporary Art and Vinyl / Trevor Schoonmaker 14

    Record Timeline / Trevor Schoonmaker 48

    Guided by Grooves: How Records Changed Music / Piotr Orlov 62

    Beware of Gramomania: The Pleasures and Pathologies of Record Collecting / Mark Katz 68

    Home of the Blues, House of Sounds: The Record Store / Charles McGovern 78

    Just for the Record: Vinyl Rules / Carlo McCormick 86

    Digging in the Crates / Mark Anthony Neal 96

    El Disco Es Cultura / Josh Kun 106

    The Record in Jamaica / Vivien Goldman 116

    Needle to the Groove: Snippets from an Omnidirectional History / Jeff Chang 124

    Do-It-Yourself / Barbara London 138

    New Feeling / Jennifer Kabat 142

    N. C. Noise / Mac McCaughan 154

    Blazing Hip-Hop and R&B / Dave Tompkins 158

    Yesterday and Today / Luc Sante 158

    Cover to Cover 168

    Exhibition Checklist and Artists' Statements 184

    Artists' Biographies 202

    Extended Playlist / Trevor Schoonmaker 212

    Selected Bibliography 215

    Timeline Reproduction Credits 216
  • Kimerly Rorschach

    Trevor Schoonmaker

    Piotr Orlov

    Mark Katz

    Charles McGovern

    Carlo McCormick

    Mark Anthony Neal

    Josh Kun

    Vivien Goldman

    Jeff Chang

    Barbara London

    Jennifer Kabat

    Mac McCaughan

    Dave Tompkins

    Luc Sante

  • The Record traces the indelible mark vinyl made on the music industry and the people who listen, from white youths crossing into black neighbourhoods in the passt to the obsessed retro collectors of today. Long live vinyl.”

    “[A] fun book to go through and, if your collection extends to vinyl pop, jazz or classical LPs you’ll love this even more.”

    “For those unable to get to the exhibition, the catalogue provides plenty of visual food for thought. . . . There’s no denying the vital inspiration provided by those in the art world, however, and this exhibition and book provide much to dwell upon. . . . These works signify not because they are made of vinyl but because they are made from records. In this way, they still speak to us: the magic lives on.”

    “Luxuriously illustrated with over four hundred color images, and stuffed with over a dozen essays, the book doubles as an exhibition supplement and an illustrated history of the record and the culture(s) it has engendered. And this is to say nothing of its exhaustive timeline, artist statements and biographies, bibliography, and what Schoonmaker calls his ‘Extended Playlist,’ which lists works that were not available for or included in the exhibition. It is wonderful to be allowed this insight into curatorial research and desire, and Schoonmaker’s sharing of what could have been hoarded away for future projects is an example we would be wise to follow. The breadth and depth of this catalogue are staggering, and the contributors—curators, photographers, historians, academics, musicologists, musicians, critics—represent the broad panorama of scholars and artists who keep records dear to their heart and at the center of their lives. As a catalogue, it is exceptional. As a testament to the ways in which the vinyl record is a universal medium that crosses all boundaries, it is paradigmatic.”

    “Schoonmaker's volume is more than a souvenir of what you saw (or will see) at the museum. It is also a collection of brilliant essays about why vinyl was important not just to musical culture, but to the very idea of a shared public culture.”

    “With essays by Luc Sante among others, and artwork by Laurie Anderson, David Byrne, Ed Ruscha and gay artist Jasper Johns, The Record is a long-player indeed.”

    Reviews

  • The Record traces the indelible mark vinyl made on the music industry and the people who listen, from white youths crossing into black neighbourhoods in the passt to the obsessed retro collectors of today. Long live vinyl.”

    “[A] fun book to go through and, if your collection extends to vinyl pop, jazz or classical LPs you’ll love this even more.”

    “For those unable to get to the exhibition, the catalogue provides plenty of visual food for thought. . . . There’s no denying the vital inspiration provided by those in the art world, however, and this exhibition and book provide much to dwell upon. . . . These works signify not because they are made of vinyl but because they are made from records. In this way, they still speak to us: the magic lives on.”

    “Luxuriously illustrated with over four hundred color images, and stuffed with over a dozen essays, the book doubles as an exhibition supplement and an illustrated history of the record and the culture(s) it has engendered. And this is to say nothing of its exhaustive timeline, artist statements and biographies, bibliography, and what Schoonmaker calls his ‘Extended Playlist,’ which lists works that were not available for or included in the exhibition. It is wonderful to be allowed this insight into curatorial research and desire, and Schoonmaker’s sharing of what could have been hoarded away for future projects is an example we would be wise to follow. The breadth and depth of this catalogue are staggering, and the contributors—curators, photographers, historians, academics, musicologists, musicians, critics—represent the broad panorama of scholars and artists who keep records dear to their heart and at the center of their lives. As a catalogue, it is exceptional. As a testament to the ways in which the vinyl record is a universal medium that crosses all boundaries, it is paradigmatic.”

    “Schoonmaker's volume is more than a souvenir of what you saw (or will see) at the museum. It is also a collection of brilliant essays about why vinyl was important not just to musical culture, but to the very idea of a shared public culture.”

    “With essays by Luc Sante among others, and artwork by Laurie Anderson, David Byrne, Ed Ruscha and gay artist Jasper Johns, The Record is a long-player indeed.”

  • Permission to Photocopy (coursepacks)

    If you are requesting permission to photocopy material for classroom use, please contact the Copyright Clearance Center at copyright.com;

    If the Copyright Clearance Center cannot grant permission, you may request permission from our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Permission to Reprint

    If you are requesting permission to reprint DUP material (journal or book selection) in another book or in any other format, contact our Copyrights & Permissions Manager (use Contact Information listed below).

    Images/Art

    Many images/art used in material copyrighted by Duke University Press are controlled, not by the Press, but by the owner of the image. Please check the credit line adjacent to the illustration, as well as the front and back matter of the book for a list of credits. You must obtain permission directly from the owner of the image. Occasionally, Duke University Press controls the rights to maps or other drawings. Please direct permission requests for these images to permissions@dukeupress.edu.
    For book covers to accompany reviews, please contact the publicity department.

    Subsidiary Rights/Foreign Translations

    If you're interested in a Duke University Press book for subsidiary rights/translations, please contact permissions@dukeupress.edu. Include the book title/author, rights sought, and estimated print run.

    Disability Requests

    Instructions for requesting an electronic text on behalf of a student with disabilities are available here.

    Rights & Permissions Contact Information

    Email: permissions@dukeupress.edu
    Email contact for coursepacks: asstpermissions@dukeupress.edu
    Fax: 919-688-4574
    Mail:
    Duke University Press
    Rights and Permissions
    905 W. Main Street
    Suite 18B
    Durham, NC 27701

    For all requests please include:
    1. Author's name. If book has an editor that is different from the article author, include editor's name also.
    2. Title of the journal article or book chapter and title of journal or title of book
    3. Page numbers (if excerpting, provide specifics)
    For coursepacks, please also note: The number of copies requested, the school and professor requesting
    For reprints and subsidiary rights, please also note: Your volume title, publication date, publisher, print run, page count, rights sought
  • Description

    The Record is the full-color catalog accompanying the groundbreaking exhibition The Record: Contemporary Art and Vinyl, at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University from September 2, 2010 through February 6, 2011. The first exhibition to explore the culture of vinyl records in the history of contemporary art, The Record features rarely exhibited work and recent and newly commissioned pieces by thirty-three artists from around the world. These artists have taken vinyl records as their subject or medium, producing sound work, sculpture, installation, drawing, painting, photography, video, and performance. Works by well-known artists such as Laurie Anderson, Jasper Johns, Ed Ruscha, and Carrie Mae Weems appear alongside those of other North American artists, and of artists from Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America, some of whom have never before exhibited in a U.S. museum. Among the works shown are David Byrne’s original Polaroid photomontage used for the cover of the 1978 Talking Heads album More Songs about Buildings and Food, the fictive soul “album covers” created by the outsider artist Mingering Mike in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and Wheel of Steel (2006), an arresting narrative of record-playing told through digital photos by the South African-born and Berlin-based artist Robin Rhode. In addition to the 225 images, 200 of which appear in color, the catalog includes personal reflections and critical analyses. All of the artists in the exhibition contribute personal statements about their work in relation to the vinyl record, and critics and scholars explore the historical impact of the record on art and music and the ways the medium has helped shape individual and collective identities.

    Contributors. Jeff Chang, Vivien Goldman, Jennifer Kabat, Mark Katz, Josh Kun, Barbara London, Mac McCaughan, Carlo McCormick, Charlie McGovern, Mark Anthony Neal, Piotr Orlov, Luc Sante, Trevor Schoonmaker, Dave Tompkins

    About The Author(s)

    Trevor Schoonmaker is Curator of Contemporary Art at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. He is the editor of Barkley L. Hendricks: Birth of the Cool; Street Level: Mark Bradford, William Cordova, and Robin Rhode; Black President: The Art and Legacy of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti; and Fela: From West Africa to West Broadway.

Explore More
Share

Create a reading list or add to an existing list. Sign-in or register now to continue.


Contact Us

  • Duke University Press
  • 905 W. Main St. Ste 18-B
  • Durham, NC 27701
  • U.S. phone (toll-free): 888-651-0122
  • International: 1-919-688-5134
  • orders@dukeupress.edu