• Diaspora′s Homeland: Modern China in the Age of Global Migration

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    Pages: 280
    Illustrations: 5 illustrations
    Sales/Territorial Rights: World
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    978-0-8223-7042-0
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    978-0-8223-7054-3
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  • A Note on Romanization  ix
    Acknowledgments  xi
    Introduction  1
    1. A Great Convergence  17
    2. Colonists of the South Seas  48
    3. Confucius from Afar  75
    4. The Women Who Stayed Behind  107
    5. Homecomings  146
    Conclusion and Epilogue  185
    Notes  197
    Bibliography  233
    Index  261
  • "A major work that shows how an intelligently reconceived concept of 'Chinese diaspora' can open up new understandings of China in world history—especially how modern China is in many ways a product of the mutually constitutive relations between the invented homeland and its diasporic populations. Based upon superb research and an imaginative engagement with a broad range of theoretical and secondary works, this is cutting edge scholarship on global population movements and their effects." — Takashi Fujitani, author of, Race for Empire: Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Americans during World War II

    "Shelly Chan's scholarship is superior in every imaginable way; her deft hand at bringing together the seldom connected fields of diaspora studies, modern Chinese history, and Asian American studies is a major contribution. I read this book straight through—I couldn't put it down." — James Hevia author of, The Imperial Security State: British Colonial Knowledge and Empire-Building in Asia

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  • Description

    In Diaspora’s Homeland Shelly Chan provides a broad historical study of how the mass migration of more than twenty million Chinese overseas influenced China’s politics, economics, and culture. Chan develops the concept of “diaspora moments”—a series of recurring disjunctions in which migrant temporalities come into tension with local, national, and global ones—to map the multiple historical geographies in which the Chinese homeland and diaspora emerge. Chan describes several distinct moments, including the lifting of the Qing emigration ban in 1893, intellectual debates in the 1920s and 1930s about whether Chinese emigration constituted colonization and whether Confucianism should be the basis for a modern Chinese identity, as well as the intersection of gender, returns, and Communist campaigns in the 1950s and 1960s. Adopting a transnational frame, Chan narrates Chinese history through a reconceptualization of diaspora to show how mass migration helped establish China as a nation-state within a global system.

    About The Author(s)

    Shelly Chan is Associate Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
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